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Description

Doc 10002 AN/502

CABIN CREW SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL First Edition — 2014

NOTICE TO USERS This document is an unedited version of an ICAO publication and has not yet been approved in final form

As its content may still be supplemented,

or otherwise modified during the editing process,

ICAO shall not be responsible whatsoever for any costs or liabilities incurred as a result of its use

Approved by the Secretary General and published under his authority

INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION ORGANIZATION

AMENDMENTS Amendments are announced in the supplements to the Catalogue of ICAO Publications

the Catalogue and its supplements are available on the ICAO website at www

The space below is provided to keep a record of such amendments

RECORD OF AMENDMENTS AND CORRIGENDA No

AMENDMENTS Date Entered by

CORRIGENDA Date Entered by

FOREWORD Cabin safety contributes to the prevention of accidents and incidents,

protection of the aircraft’s occupants,

through proactive safety management,

including hazard identification,

safety risk management and the increase of survivability in the event of an emergency situation

Traditionally,

the role of cabin crew members focused on the evacuation of an aircraft in the event of an accident

However,

cabin crew members also play an important proactive role in managing safety,

which can contribute to the prevention of incidents and accidents

Training is necessary to prepare cabin crew members to conduct their safetyrelated duties and responsibilities during normal day-to-day flights and essential to enable them to recognize and act on any abnormal or emergency situation

The ICAO Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002) provides guidance related to cabin crew training requirements found in Annex 6 — Operation of Aircraft,

Part I — International Commercial Air Transport — Aeroplanes

ICAO developed guidance for a competency-based approach to cabin crew safety training so that cabin crew members may be proficient to perform their duties and responsibilities,

and with the goal of establishing an international baseline for cabin crew competencies

The manual presents cabin crew safety training using a competency-based approach

It provides guidance for operators to develop cabin crew competency-based training

The content of this manual is adaptable and operators should tailor it to suit their operation

It is also provided as guidance for States when approving a training programme

However,

the content does not represent the sole means to meet regulatory requirements on cabin crew training

The training syllabus of cabin crew members assigned for duties on commercial international air transport operations should include all relevant parts of the syllabuses suggested in this manual but should not be limited by it

This document replaces ICAO Cabin Attendants’ Safety Training Manual (Doc 7192,

Part E-1,

Second Edition,

The content of this manual was developed over a period of two years with inputs from experts from civil aviation authorities,

airline and cabin crew representative organizations,

aviation medicine and human performance specialists

and was thereafter submitted for an extensive peer review to collect and take into account comments from the expert community

ICAO gratefully acknowledges the contribution received from the ICAO Cabin Safety Group,

as well as the IATA Medical Advisory Group,

members of the ICAO Medical Provisions Study Group,

and individual experts who have provided support,

advice and input for this manual

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ICAO gratefully acknowledges contributions from the following: Air Canada

Federal Aviation Administration

Air Canada Rouge

Flight Attendant School (“Школа бортпроводников”)

Air France GOL Linhas Aéreas Inteligentes Air New Zealand International Air Transport Association Air Transat International Transport Workers’ Federation Airbus Jamaica Civil Aviation Authority Alitalia – Compagnia Aerea Italiana Jetstar Airways American Airlines Kenya Airways Avianca Airlines KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Boeing Company Lufthansa German Airlines British Airways National Civil Aviation Agency of Brazil Calm Air International Provincial Airlines Cathay Pacific Airways Saudia Airlines Central American Agency for Aviation Safety Singapore Airlines Civil Aviation Authority of Israel Sky Regional Airlines Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand South Africa Civil Aviation Authority Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore Transport Canada Civil Aviation Civil Aviation Safety Authority of Australia UAE General Civil Aviation Authority Condor Flugdienst UK Civil Aviation Authority Emirates Airline United Airlines European Aviation Safety Agency Federal Air Transport Agency (Rosaviatsia)

TABLE OF CONTENTS Foreword

Acknowledgement

List of Acronyms

Definitions

Chapter 1: Cabin crew safety training requirements and qualifications

Overview of cabin safety and the role of cabin crew

Appendix 1 to Chapter 1: Examples of requalification programmes

Facilities and equipment for classroom-based training

Chapter 3: Competency-based approach to cabin crew safety training

Understanding competency-based training programmes

Chapter 4: Aviation indoctrination training

Definition and goal of aviation indoctrination training

Chapter 5: Normal operations training

Definition and goal of normal operations training

Appendix 1 to Chapter 5

Competency framework for cabin crew member’s duties and responsibilities during normal operations

Abnormal and emergency situations training

Definition of goal of abnormal and emergency situations training

Appendix 1 to Chapter 6

Competency framework for cabin crew member’s duties and responsibilities during abnormal and emergency situations

Chapter 7

Dangerous goods training

Definition and goal of dangerous goods training

Appendix 1 to Chapter 7

Competency framework for cabin crew member’s duties and responsibilities related to dangerous goods

Human performance training

Definition and goal of human performance training

Appendix 1 to Chapter 8

Cabin crew skills and behavioural indicators

Chapter 9

Cabin health and first aid training

Introduction

Appendix 1 to Chapter 9

Competency framework for cabin crew member’s duties and responsibilities related to cabin health and first aid

Aviation security training

Definition and goal of aviation security training

Chemical/biological/radiological weapons

Appendix 1 to Chapter 10

Competency framework for cabin crew member’s duties and responsibilities related to security threat situations

Safety management system (SMS) training

Definition and goal of SMS training

Chapter 12

Fatigue management training

Definition and goal of fatigue management training

Chapter 13

In-charge cabin crew member training

Definition and goal of in-charge cabin crew member training

cooperation and coordination within the crew and with other personnel

Chapter 14

Management aspects of the cabin safety training programme

Overview

Appendix 1 to Chapter 14

Competency frameworks for cabin crew instructors,

cabin crew examiners and training programme developers

LIST OF ACRONYMS

AC AOC AQP ATO CASS CBR CBT CPR CRM CTD EASA ELT ELT(AF) ELT(AP) ELT(S) EU FAA FRMS I/C ISD LMS MEL MMEL OSD PBE PC PED SARPs SMS SSP STC TCCA TEM UTC

Advisory circular Air operator certificate Advanced qualification programme Approved training organization Commercial air service standards Chemical/biological/radiological Computer-based training Cardiopulmonary resuscitation Crew resource management Cabin training devices European Aviation Safety Agency Emergency locator transmitter Automatic-fixed ELT Automatic-deployable ELT Survival ELT European Union Federal Aviation Administration Fatigue risk management system In-charge cabin crew member Instructional systems design Learning management system Minimum equipment list Master minimum equipment list Operational suitability data Protective breathing equipment Performance criteria Personal electronic device Standards and Recommended Practices Safety management system State safety programme Supplemental type certificate Transport Canada Civil Aviation Threat and error management Coordinated universal time ———————————

Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002)

DEFINITIONS Able-bodied passengers

Passengers who are clearly physically able and are willing to help cabin crew maintain good order and discipline on-board the aircraft

Accountable executive

A single,

identifiable person having responsibility for the effective and efficient performance of the State’s safety programme (SSP) or of the service provider’s safety management systems (SMS)

Air operator certificate (AOC)

A certificate authorizing an operator to carry out specified commercial air transport operations

Aircraft

Any machine that can derive support in the atmosphere from the reactions of the air other than the reactions of the air against the earth’s surface

Airworthy

The status of an aircraft,

propeller or part when it conforms to its approved design and is in a condition for safe operation Approved training organization — Cabin crew

An organization approved by a Contracting State in accordance with the national regulations to perform cabin crew training and which operates under the supervision of that State

Approved training — Cabin crew

Training conducted under special curricula and supervision approved by a Contracting State that,

is conducted within an approved training organization

Attendant panel

Control panel(s) intended for use by cabin crew to operate and/or monitor aircraft systems relevant to cabin crew duties during normal operations and in the event of emergency situations

Baggage

Personal property of passengers or crew carried on an aircraft by agreement with the operator

Barostatic

An atmospheric pressure,

used in forecasting the weather and determining altitude,

Cabin crew member

A crew member who performs,

in the interest of safety of passengers,

duties assigned by the operator or the pilot-in-command of the aircraft,

but who shall not act as a flight crew member

Change management

A formal process to manage changes within an organization in a systematic manner,

so that changes which may impact identified hazards and risk mitigation strategies are accounted for,

before the implementation of such changes

Classroom training

In-person,

instructor-led training which may include group exercises and interactive instructional sessions

Clean aircraft concept

All critical surfaces of an aircraft must be clean of any surface contamination

The critical surfaces of an aircraft are the wings,

vertical stabilizers or any other stabilizing surface

In the case of an aircraft with rear mounted engines,

the upper surface of the fuselage is also a critical surface

Clear zone

The area of the passenger cabin immediately in front of the flight crew compartment door,

including galleys and lavatories

Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002)

Cognitive

Pertaining to cognition

Knowing,

or conceiving as an act or faculty distinct from emotion and volition

Colicky pain

Denoting or resembling the pain of colic: pain relating to the colon

Spasmodic pains in the abdomen caused by spasm,

Competency element

An action that constitutes a task that has a triggering event and a terminating event that clearly defines its limits,

Competency unit

A discrete function consisting of a number of competency elements

Competency

A combination of skills,

knowledge and attitudes required to perform a task to the prescribed standard

Co-pilot

A licensed pilot serving in any piloting capacity other than as pilot-in-command but excluding a pilot who is on board the aircraft for the sole purpose of receiving flight instruction

Computer-based training

Training involving instructional aids,

Computer-based training may encompass the use of CD-ROMs as well as web-based training (commonly referred to as eLearning)

Crew member

A person assigned by an operator to duty on an aircraft during a flight duty period

Critical phases of flight

The period of high workload on the flight deck,

normally being the periods between the beginning of taxiing until the aircraft is on the route climb phase and between the final part of descent to aircraft parking

Cruising level

A level maintained during a significant portion of a flight

Dangerous goods

Articles or substances which are capable of posing a risk to health,

property or the environment and which are shown in the list of dangerous goods in the Technical Instructions or which are classified according to those Instructions

— Dangerous goods are classified in Annex 18 — The Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air,

Chapter 3

Defences

Specific mitigating actions,

preventive controls or recovery measures put in place to prevent the realization of a hazard or its escalation into an undesirable consequence

Disinfection

The procedure whereby health measures are taken to control or kill infectious agents on a human or animal body,

in or on affected parts of aircraft,

by direct exposure to chemical or physical agents

Disinsection

The procedure whereby health measures are taken to control or kill insects present in aircraft,

Duty period

A period which starts when a flight or cabin crew member is required by an operator to report for or to commence a duty and ends when that person is free from all duties

Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002)

Any task that flight or cabin crew members are required by the operator to perform,

positioning and standby when it is likely to induce fatigue

Embarkation

The boarding of an aircraft for the purpose of commencing a flight,

except by such crew or passengers as have embarked on a previous stage of the same through-flight

Emergency exit

tail cone exit) used as an egress point to allow maximum opportunity for cabin evacuation within an appropriate time period

Emergency locator transmitter (ELT)

A generic term describing equipment which broadcast distinctive signals on designated frequencies and,

may be automatically activated by impact or be manually activated

An ELT may be any of the following: Automatic-fixed ELT (ELT(AF))

An automatically activated ELT which is permanently attached to an aircraft

Automatic-portable ELT (ELT(AP))

An automatically activated ELT which is rigidly attached to an aircraft but readily removable from the aircraft

Automatic-deployable ELT (ELT(AD))

An ELT which is rigidly attached to an aircraft and which is automatically deployed and activated by impact,

Manual deployment is also provided

Survival ELT (ELT(S))

An ELT which is removable from an aircraft,

stowed so as to facilitate its ready use in an emergency,

and manually activated by survivors Error

An action or inaction by an operational person that leads to deviations from organizational or the operational person’s intentions or expectations

— See Attachment E of Annex 13 — Aircraft Accident and Incident Investigation for a description of operational personnel

Error management

The process of detecting and responding to errors with countermeasures that reduce or eliminate the consequence of errors and mitigate the probability of further errors or undesired states

Exanthematous diseases

Relating to an exanthema: a skin eruption occurring as a symptom of an acute viral or coccal disease,

as in scarlet fever or measles

Fatigue

A physiological state of reduced mental or physical performance capability resulting from sleep loss or extended wakefulness,

or workload (mental and/or physical activity) that can impair a crew member’s alertness and ability to safely operate an aircraft or perform safety-related duties

Fatigue risk management system (FRMS)

A data-driven means of continuously monitoring and managing fatigue-related safety risks,

based upon scientific principles and knowledge as well as operational experience that aims to ensure relevant personnel are performing at adequate levels of alertness

Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002)

Flight crew member

A licensed crew member charged with duties essential to the operation of an aircraft during a flight duty period

Flight duty period

A period which commences when a flight or cabin crew member is required to report for duty that includes a flight or a series of flights and which finishes when the aeroplane finally comes to rest and the engines are shut down at the end of the last flight on which he/she is a crew member

Flight simulation training device

Any one of the following three types of apparatus in which flight conditions are simulated on the ground: A flight simulator,

which provides an accurate representation of the flight deck of a particular aircraft type to the extent that the mechanical,

aircraft systems control functions,

the normal environment of flight crew members,

and the performance and flight characteristics of that type of aircraft are realistically simulated

A flight procedures trainer,

which provides a realistic flight deck environment,

and which simulates instrument responses,

simple control functions of mechanical,

and the performance and flight characteristics of aircraft of a particular class

A basic instrument flight trainer,

which is equipped with appropriate instruments,

and which simulates the flight deck environment of an aircraft in flight in instrument flight conditions

Flight time — Aeroplanes

The total time from the moment an aeroplane first moves for the purpose of taking off until the moment it finally comes to rest at the end of the flight

— Flight time as here defined is synonymous with the term “block to block” time or “chock to chock” time in general usage which is measured from the time an aeroplane first moves for the purpose of taking off until it finally stops at the end of the flight

Ground handling

Services necessary for an aircraft’s arrival at,

other than air traffic services

Hands-on exercise

Exercise on the use of equipment/aircraft systems that is conducted without a specific context

Equipment that is removed from operation,

or other representative training equipment considered acceptable by State,

can be used for the purposes of this training

Human factors principles

Principles which apply to aeronautical design,

operations and maintenance and which seek safe interface between the human and other system components by proper consideration to human performance

Human performance

Human capabilities and limitations which have an impact on the safety and efficiency of aeronautical operations

Hypoglycaemic attack

Pertaining to or characterized by hypoglycaemia: abnormal decrease in concentration of glucose in the circulating blood,

less than the minimum of the normal range

Hypothermia

A subnormal body temperature significantly below 37°C

Hypoxia

A deficiency of oxygen in inspired gases,

short of anoxia (almost complete absence of oxygen)

Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002)

Improvised explosive device

A device,

and fabricated in an improvised manner incorporating explosives or destructive,

pyrotechnic or incendiary chemicals designed to destroy,

In-flight

The period from the moment all external aircraft doors are closed following boarding through the moment when one external door is opened to allow passengers to leave the aircraft or until,

competent authorities take over responsibility for the aircraft and individuals and property on the aircraft

For the purpose of the Tokyo Convention an aircraft is considered to be in flight from the moment when power is applied for the purpose of take-off until the moment when the landing run ends

In-charge cabin crew member

Cabin crew leader who has overall responsibility for the conduct and coordination of cabin procedures applicable during normal operations and during abnormal and emergency situations for flights operated with more than one cabin crew member

Lockdown

The condition of the flight crew compartment door being closed and locked securely,

with no traffic permitted either in or out of the flight crew compartment

Medical assessment

The evidence issued by a Contracting State that the licence holder meets specific requirements of medical fitness Minimum equipment list (MEL)

A list which provides for the operation of aircraft,

subject to specified conditions,

with particular equipment inoperative,

prepared by an operator in conformity with,

the master minimum equipment list (MMEL) established for the aircraft type

Mock-up

A training device that is a partial,

functional replica of an actual aircraft,

Operations manual

A manual containing procedures,

instructions and guidance for use by operational personnel in the execution of their duties

Operator

A person,

organization or enterprise engaged in or offering to engage in an aircraft operation

Performance criteria

Simple,

evaluative statements on the required outcome of the competency element and a description of the criteria used to judge whether the required level of performance has been achieved

Person with disabilities

Any person whose mobility is reduced due to a physical incapacity (sensory or locomotor),

illness or any other cause of disability when using transport and whose situation needs special attention and the adaptation to the person’s needs of the services made available to all passengers

Pilot-in-command

The pilot designated by the operator,

or in the case of general aviation,

as being in command and charged with the safe conduct of a flight

Pressure-altitude

An atmospheric pressure expressed in terms of altitude which corresponds to that pressure in the Standard Atmosphere

Prophylaxis

Prevention of disease or injury or a process which can lead to disease or injury

Protective breathing equipment (PBE)

Breathing equipment providing full,

sealed protection against smoke,

the collar and upper shoulder area

Fifteen-minutes minimum oxygen supply per PBE is recommended

Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002)

Psychoactive substances

Alcohol,

whereas coffee and tobacco are excluded

Remote on-board areas

Areas that are not in the passenger compartment but that are accessible to occupants,

Rest period

A continuous and defined period of time,

subsequent to and/or prior to duty,

during which flight or cabin crew members are free of all duties

Risk mitigation

The process of incorporating defences or preventive controls to lower the severity and/or likelihood of a hazard’s projected consequence

Safety management system

A systematic approach to managing safety,

including the necessary organizational structures,

Safety risk

The predicted probability and severity of the consequences or outcomes of a hazard

Simulated exercise

Exercise representing a full context scenario (e

aircraft evacuation) where cabin crew apply the operator’s procedures and associated crew responsibilities for dealing with the specific situation

This is typically conducted in a representative training device capable of reproducing the appropriate environment/equipment characteristics (e

Simulator

An apparatus which provides an accurate representation of the flight deck and/or cabin of a particular aircraft type to the extent that the mechanical,

aircraft systems control functions,

the normal environment of flight crew members and/or cabin crew members and the performance and characteristics of that type of aircraft are realistically simulated

Special categories of passengers

Persons who need special conditions,

or equipment when travelling by air

These may include but are not limited to: a) b) c) d) e) f)

persons with mobility impairments

deportees or persons in custody

State of the Operator

The State in which the operator’s principal place of business is located or,

if there is no such place of business,

the operator’s permanent residence

Sterile flight deck

During critical phases of flight and all flight operations (except cruise) conducted below 10 000 feet,

no crew member may engage in any activity or conversation that is not required for safe operation of the aircraft

Non-essential cockpit-cabin communication is prohibited during this period

Technical Instructions

The Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (Doc 9284),

approved and issued periodically in accordance with the procedure established by the ICAO Council

Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002)

Threat levels

A series of four defined threat levels of passenger disturbances,

established so as to give common definition and thereby understanding to all concerned parties as to what is occurring on the aircraft: Level 1 — Disruptive behaviour (suspicious or verbally threatening)

Level 2 — Physically abusive behaviour

Level 3 — Life-threatening behaviour

Level 4 — Attempted breach or actual breach of the flight crew compartment

Events or errors that occur beyond the influence of an operational person,

increase operational complexity and must be managed to maintain the margin of safety

— See Attachment E of Annex 13 — Aircraft Accident and Incident Investigation for a description of operational personnel

Threat and error management (TEM)

An overarching safety concept regarding aviation operations and human performance

Threat management

The process of detecting and responding to threats with countermeasures that reduce or eliminate the consequences of threats and mitigate the probability of errors or undesired states

Tokyo Convention

Convention on Offences and Certain Other Acts Committed on Board Aircraft,

signed at Tokyo on 14 September 1963

Unstaffed exit

Emergency exit for which no cabin crew member has been positioned for the flight

——————————

Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002) CHAPTER 1

CABIN CREW SAFETY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS AND QUALIFICATIONS

Overview of cabin safety and the role of cabin crew

the protection of the aircraft’s occupants,

through proactive safety management,

including hazard identification and safety risk management,

and the increase of survivability in the event of an emergency situation

Cabin safety focuses on: regulations relating to cabin operations,

operator’s procedures and documentation,

cabin crew training and qualifications (including facilities and devices),

equipment and furnishings on board aircraft,

and the operational environment

in the interest of safety of passengers,

duties assigned by the operator or the pilot-in-command of the aircraft,

but who shall not act as a flight crew member

Traditionally,

the role of cabin crew members focused on the evacuation of an aircraft in the event of an accident

However,

cabin crew members also play an important proactive role in managing safety,

which can contribute to the prevention of accidents

This role includes,

but is not limited to: a) preventing incidents from escalating in the cabin,

b) informing the flight crew of abnormal situations observed in the cabin or relating to the aircraft,

such as pressurization problems,

and contamination of critical surfaces

and c) preventing unlawful interference and managing passenger events that can compromise safety and security of the flight,

Cabin crew members play a key role in identifying hazards and reporting any condition that can pose a risk to the safe operation of an aircraft and to its occupants’ safety

Cabin crew safety training

both in terms of day-to-day safety management in normal operations and in the event of an abnormal or emergency situation,

requires that they undergo specialized and thorough training to gain sound knowledge of their safety role and the required competencies needed to perform their duties and responsibilities

Since accidents are statistically rare,

the training programme needs to ensure that cabin crew members remain proficient and are able to execute the required tasks in the event that they occur

and the role that cabin crew members play in maintaining safety

Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002)

particularly for some key topics such as crew resource management

Joint training enhances communication and coordination and promotes a better understanding of the crew members’ roles and responsibilities

This aspect is discussed in detail in Chapter 8

Beyond safety and abnormal/emergency procedures,

cabin crew members must manage security-related events,

and participate in the operator’s overarching management programmes,

such as safety management systems

Training should encompass all these aspects

and with the goal of establishing an international baseline for cabin crew competencies

As a result,

this manual has been rewritten to align with this approach

An overview of the competency-based approach is presented in Chapter 3

The cabin crew competency framework is presented in appendices of Chapters 5,

10 and 14

ICAO Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPs)

Part I — International Commercial Air Transport — Aeroplanes,

states that: “An operator shall establish,

to the satisfaction of the State of the Operator,

the minimum number of cabin crew required for each type of aeroplane,

based on seating capacity or the number of passengers carried,

in order to effect a safe and expeditious evacuation of the aeroplane,

and the necessary functions to be performed in an emergency or a situation requiring emergency evacuation

The operator shall assign these functions for each type of aeroplane

Part I,

which states that: “An operator shall establish and maintain a training programme,

approved by the State of the Operator,

to be completed by all persons before being assigned as a cabin crew member

Cabin crew members shall complete a recurrent training programme annually

These training programmes shall ensure that each person is: a) competent to execute those safety duties and functions which the cabin crew member is assigned to perform in the event of an emergency or in a situation requiring emergency evacuation

b) drilled and capable in the use of emergency and life-saving equipment required to be carried,

first-aid and universal precaution kits,

and automated external defibrillators

c) when serving on aircrafts operated above 3 000 m (10 000 ft),

knowledgeable as regards the effect of lack of oxygen and,

in the case of pressurized aircrafts,

Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002) physiological phenomena accompanying a loss of pressurization

d) aware of other crew members’ assignments and functions in the event of an emergency so far as is necessary for the fulfilment of the cabin crew member’s own duties

e) aware of the types of dangerous goods which may,

be carried in a passenger cabin

and f) knowledgeable about human performance as related to passenger cabin safety duties including flight crew-cabin crew coordination

The content of dangerous goods training for cabin crew members,

detailed in the Technical Instructions,

recognition of undeclared dangerous goods

provisions for passengers and crew

Part I,

which states that: “An operator shall establish and maintain an approved security training programme which ensures crew members act in the most appropriate manner to minimize the consequences of acts of unlawful interference

As a minimum,

this programme shall include the following elements: a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h)

determination of the seriousness of any occurrence

crew communication and coordination

appropriate self-defence responses

use of non-lethal protective devices assigned to crew members whose use is authorized by the State of the Operator

understanding of behaviour of terrorists so as to facilitate the ability of crew members to cope with hijacker behaviour and passenger responses

live situational training exercises regarding various threat conditions

flight crew compartment procedures to protect the aircraft

and aircraft search procedures and guidance on least-risk bomb locations where practicable

An operator shall also establish and maintain a training programme to acquaint appropriate employees with preventive measures and techniques in relation to passengers,

stores and supplies intended for carriage on an aircraft so that they contribute to the prevention of acts of sabotage or other forms of unlawful interference

Recommended minimum qualifications

there are no international Standards for the qualifications of cabin crew members

However,

it is important that specific minimum qualifications relating to fitness to perform duties and

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age and other aspects are met,

so that cabin crew members can fulfil their role in terms of safety management

Cabin crew members must be able to operate equipment and systems which may be physically challenging,

manage the cabin and communicate effectively with flight crew members,

other personnel and passengers

These qualifications should be in accordance with national regulations,

Recommended minimum qualifications typically include: a) a minimum age requirement (at least 18 years old)

b) high school diploma or an equivalent diploma (10 years of schooling or more)

write and understand a designated common language to ensure appropriate communication with both crew members and passengers (refer to 1

d) the ability to retrieve safety and emergency equipment and open and close overhead bins on the aircraft,

e) the ability and strength to operate equipment/systems,

as applicable to the operator’s procedures during normal,

abnormal and emergency situations and to the aircraft type(s) to which the cabin crew member will be assigned duties

f) clear of a criminal record/pass a security background check

and g) meet any other requirements,

as defined by the State of the operator or the operator itself (e

Types of training

The types of training addressed are as follows: a) b) c) d) e) f)

Initial training

The goal of initial training is to ensure that each trainee acquires the competencies,

knowledge and skills required to perform the duties and responsibilities related to the safety of passengers and flight during normal,

abnormal and emergency situations

This is accomplished through classroom instruction and computer-based training (CBT) complemented by a series of hands-on and simulated exercises such

Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002)

as first aid and fire-fighting

Cabin crew trainees must complete initial training before they are assigned duties as cabin crew members

Initial training includes: a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h)

abnormal and emergency procedures

and duties and responsibilities relating to aviation security

Aircraft type training

B777 or A330)

if applicable to the particular aircraft: a) aircraft description

b) cabin configuration (number and distribution of cabin crew seats and number of passenger seats)

c) cabin layout (interior design,

stowage compartments such as overhead bins,

f) flight deck familiarisation and egress

g) crew rest areas (normal and emergency egress) and other remote areas

i) assisting evacuation means (slide,

j) safety and emergency equipment,

including location and operation

k) aircraft systems relevant to cabin crew duties: i) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) vii) viii) ix) x)

communication systems and associated signalling panels

in-flight entertainment system,

exterior and emergency lights)

oxygen system (cabin and flight deck)

smoke detection system and smoke removal

l) installed emergency locator transmitter

m) normal procedures and the related hands-on and/or simulated exercises

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n) abnormal and emergency procedures and the related hands-on and/or simulated exercises

and o) design-related elements that may impact on normal and/or emergency procedures (stairs,

non-forward facing passenger seats,

cargo areas if accessible from the passenger compartment during flight,

CBT as well as hands-on and simulated exercises with a representative training device capable of reproducing the appropriate environment/equipment characteristics,

Differences training

Examples of different models include an Airbus A320 vs

A340 or a Boeing B737 vs

Examples of different series include a B777-200 vs

B777-300 or an A330-200 vs

A330-300

The training should include the following as a minimum,

as applicable to the particular a) b) c) d) e) f)

assisting evacuation means (slide,

safety and emergency equipment,

including location and operation

aircraft systems relevant to cabin crew duties (refer to 1

normal procedures and the related hands-on and/or simulated exercises

abnormal and emergency procedures and the related hands-on and/or simulated exercises

and g) design-related elements that may impact on normal and/or emergency procedures (stairs,

non-forward facing passenger seats,

cargo areas if accessible from the passenger compartment during flight,

as well as hands-on and simulated exercises with a representative training device capable of reproducing the appropriate environment/equipment characteristics,

Aircraft visit

Each cabin crew trainee having no previous comparable operating experience should participate in a visit to an aircraft prior to participating on a familiarisation flight (refer to 1

The visit is typically conducted on board a stationary aircraft

Aircraft visits should be conducted by suitably qualified persons and in accordance with a syllabus described in the operations manual

They should be conducted in accordance with national regulations,

interior and systems including the following,

if applicable to the particular aircraft: a) cabin crew stations

Cabin Crew Safety Training Manual (Doc 10002) b) cabin layout (interior design,

stowage compartments such as overhead bins,

e) flight deck familiarisation and egress

f) crew rest areas and any other remote areas

g) safety and emergency equipment

h) exits (location and their environment)

i) assisting evacuation means (location and stowage)

j) aircraft systems relevant to cabin crew duties: i) communication systems and associated signalling panels

iii) electrical system (galley,

in-flight entertainment system,

vi) lighting system (interior,

exterior and emergency lights): vii) oxygen system (cabin and flight deck)

and k) cargo areas if accessible from the passenger compartment during flight

Familiarization flight

Each cabin crew trainee having no previous comparable operating experience should participate in a familiarisation flight as described below

Familiarization flights should be conducted in accordance with national regulations,