PDF constant false alarm rate matlab -1 CURRICULUM VITAE Date Prepared - Duke Global Health Institute - CFAR Thesis - James Jen - PDF
Wait Loading...


PDF :1 PDF :2 PDF :3 PDF :4 PDF :5 PDF :6 PDF :7


Like and share and download

CFAR Thesis - James Jen - PDF

1 CURRICULUM VITAE Date Prepared - Duke Global Health Institute

PDF Cfar thesis james jenmuslimwomen ua cfar thesis james jen pdf PDF Master's Thesis Design of a Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR utwente nl en eemcs sacs teaching Thesis sniekers pdf PDF Basic Principles ResearchGate

Related PDF

Cfar thesis james jen

[PDF] Cfar thesis james jenmuslimwomen ua cfar thesis james jen pdf
PDF

Master's Thesis Design of a Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR

[PDF] Master's Thesis Design of a Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR utwente nl en eemcs sacs teaching Thesis sniekers pdf
PDF

Basic Principles - ResearchGate

[PDF] Basic Principles ResearchGate researchgate 5BRichards M 2C Scheer J 2C Holm W 5D Principles of mo pdf
PDF

Download Sample Research Paper Proposal Template PDF

[PDF] Download Sample Research Paper Proposal Template PDFcommunity spring is sample research paper proposal template pdf
PDF

Al-Mustansiriya University, College of Engineering, Electrical

[PDF] Al Mustansiriya University, College of Engineering, Electrical jofamericanscience 025 27340am101114 185 190 pdf
PDF

writing system development and reform: a process - Emil Kirkegaard

[PDF] writing system development and reform a process Emil Kirkegaardemilkirkegaard dk Writing system development and reform A process pdf
PDF

1 CURRICULUM VITAE Date Prepared - Duke Global Health Institute

6 Mar 2019 Dissertation title Psychological sense of community Development of measures of its Proeschold‐Bell, R J , LeGrand, S , James, J , Wallace, A , Adams, C , & Toole, D (2011) A Early Career Mentee, CFAR Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Network, 2006 Jennifer Rackliff, Thesis Chair
PDF

CFBAI complaint against YouTube Kids

Coke's Broken Marketing Pledges - Center for Science in the Public

CFBAI Participants' Child Directed Advertising Commitments 38 that company owned channels on YouTube claims, nutrition standards for all foods and Dec 21, 2012 the Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative (CFBAI), a significant self cated

  1. CFBAI Annual Report on Compliance and Progress
  2. Rethinking Children's Advertising Policies for the Digital Age
  3. A Review of Food Marketing to Children and Adolescents
  4. Food and Beverage Marketing to Children and Adolescents
  5. Sports Sponsorships of Food and Nonalcoholic Beverages
  6. Council of Better Business Bureaus ANNUAL REPORT
  7. Limited progress in the nutrition quality and marketing of children's
  8. Digital Food Marketing to Children and Adolescents
  9. Evaluating Fast Food Nutrition and Marketing to Youth
  10. Evaluating snack food nutrition and marketing to youth

CFBC Boiler - A Survey

Cfbc Boiler Startup - Esyes

PDF A Survey on Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion Boilers ijareeie ijareeie upload 2013 august 55 A 20Survey pdf PDF CFD Simulation On CFBC Boiler Semantic Scholar pdf s semanticscholar 5d7249ee7f6107ed581041f8e8ae49dda90b

CFC Household Heads Manual

manual index - Region 7

PDF The Household Head's Manual WordPress sfceast1 files wordpress sfc household heads manual pdf PDF Household Jumpstart Manual for HH Servants CFC YFL cfcyfl wp hh jumpstart manual for hh servants

  1. sfc household topics 2018
  2. sfc household topics 2019
  3. cfc prayer meeting guide english
  4. rekindle household topics

CFC-YFC Songbook_ Oct 23

Art For - Book Library

PDF FREE Pdf Cfc Glory Song BOOK Download Esy esjrucm esy es 25b5067 cfc glory song pdf PDF Yfc Cfc Songs Lyrics Chords Andalbi chrysler laval acouture elidevappdrupal1 elisys servers ca yfc cfc songs lyrics chords and pdf PDF Liveloud Chords And Lyrics

CF_Cables

deeluxcablecom

heat trace admin files 284 pdf of FSLe CT CF cables, which should have one conductor cut back in order to maintain minimum 5mm clearance distance between the two conductor ends (See illustration ) Remove approx 60mm of outer jacket from the cut end and push the

CFD Associates

2015 Ann - Proceedingscom

PDF Chand & Associates CFD cfd np audit report pdf PDF Ensuring that CFD for Industrial Application is “Fit for NAFEMS nafems cfd nafems cfd webinar november 09 pdf

  1. city cfd
  2. sweetwater high cfd 1
  3. cfd san diego
  4. community facilities districts
  5. chfa cfd 2014
  6. escaya mello roos
  7. cfd 4
  8. eureka springs escondido mello roos

CFD Simulation and Heat Transfer Analysis of Automobile Radiator using Helical tubes

Simulation and CFD Analysis of heat pipe heat exchanger using

PDF CFD analysis of forced convective heat transfer coefficients at urbanphysics 2015 JWEIA HM BB DD JC JH CHTC geom pdf PDF heat transfer analyses using computational fluid dynamics SciELO scielo br pdf bjce v30n4

  1. computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer 3rd pdf
  2. cfd thermal analysis

CFD TUTORIAL – RIGID BODY MODELING - EDR

Computational Fluid Dynamics for Engineers - Assets - Cambridge

PDF Numerical Analysis of Shear Thickening Fluids for Blast Core core ac uk download pdf 36704082 pdf PDF Computational Fluid Dynamics for Engineersingegneriaterni altervista BOOK Bengt Andersson et al Computational fluid dynamics for engineers 2012

  1. cfd introduction
  2. computational fluid dynamics examples
  3. importance of computational fluid dynamics
  4. pulliam cfd
  5. cfd for beginners
  6. cfd procedure
  7. programming for cfd
  8. cfd problems and solutions

CFDS Trouble Shooting

Cutting Design Costs: How Industry leaders - Ozen Engineering

Troubleshooting Problematic Chlorine Mixing Dynamics with CFD Analysis N Landes1*, G Boksiner1, and R Stencel2 1 Freese and Nichols, Inc , Fort Worth,   Four major challenges face the future of industrial CFD based analysis and design Key issues Grid

  1. Troubleshooting Problematic Chlorine Mixing Dynamics with CFD
  2. THE CHALLENGES OF PRESENT AND FUTURE INDUSTRIAL CFD
  3. CFD
  4. Hydraulic modeling with CFD
  5. ANSYS CFD in the industry
  6. A CFD Primer
  7. blast furnace cfd simulation and vr visualization
  8. Unsteady Flow Problems
  9. Improvement and Troubleshooting
  10. The application of CFD in troubleshooting
Home back Next

Description

A STUDY OF CFAR IMPLEMENTATION COST AND PERFORMANCE TRADEOFFS IN HETEROGENEOUS ENVIRONMENTS

A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of California State Polytechnic University,

In Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Science In Electrical and Computer Engineering

By James J

Jen 2011

SIGNATURE PAGE          THESIS:       A STUDY OF CFAR IMPLEMENTATION COST AND          PERFORMATIVE TRADEOFFS IN HETEROGENEOUS          ENVIRONMENTS       AUTHOR:      James J

 Jen      DATE SUBMITTED:    Spring 2011              Electrical and Computer Engineering        Dr

 Zekeriya Aliyazicioglu               _________________________________________  Thesis Committee Chair  Electrical and Computer Engineering  College of Engineering        Dr

K Hwang                               _________________________________________  Electrical and Computer Engineering  College of Engineering        Dr

 James Kang                               _________________________________________  Electrical and Computer Engineering  College of Engineering 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS   

 I recall clearly last year when, at the end of a Signal Processing lecture, Profes‐

sor Hwang asked for interest in graduate research

 My time at Cal Poly Pomona, up un‐ til that point, had been rocky and undistinguished

 Tentative, I almost didn’t approach  the professor that

 I’m glad I did

 The last year of graduate research with Professors  Hwang and Zeki had meaningfully colored  and enriched my graduate studies

Much  thanks to Professor H

 Hwang and Zekeriya Aliyazicioglu: firstly, for the 

opportunity for research and their many Friday mornings spent on us students, and  secondly, for their invaluable guidance and encouragement throughout

Appreciation  too to Thales‐Raytheon for supporting the research, and particu‐

larly to Tom Nichols Walker Birrell for their expertise and input

Thanks too to Nellie Qian, who, for most of the past year, had been my partner 

in crime in MATLAB ventures from Minimax beamforming, to antenna array interfer‐ ence suppression, and finally to this CFAR thing that had become our thesis

    

And thanks, most sincerely, to my mom and dad— Emily and Chin‐Ping Jen— 

for their support, encouragement, and patience

ABSTRACT   

CFAR— Constant False Alarm Rate— is a critical component in RADAR detec‐

 Through the judicial setting of detection threshold, CFAR algorithms allow RADAR  systems to set detection thresholds and reliably differentiate between targets of inter‐ est and interfering noise or clutter

In many operating conditions, noise and clutter distributions may be highly het‐

erogeneous— with sudden jumps in clutter power or with the presence of multiple tar‐ gets in close proximity

 A good CFAR algorithm must reliably operate in these condi‐ tions but without prohibitively high implementation costs

In this thesis, we investigate a number of CFAR algorithms— new and old— all 

the while assessing their operational flexibility and cost of operation

    

As balance of performance and implementation cost, two algorithms stood out 

as desirable: Variability Index (VI) CFAR— a procedure that allowed for dynamically se‐ lection between the leading, lagging, or whole of the reference windows— and Switch‐ ing (S) CFAR— a test cell technique that allowed for the selection of representative  subsets of the reference cell as compared to the cell under test

 We conclude with de‐ veloping a new algorithm: Switching Variability‐Index (SVI) CFAR that combines the ad‐ vantages of both VI and S CFAR

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Signature Page …………………………………………………………………………………………………………  ii  Acknowledgements ………………………………………………………………………………………………

  iii  Abstract …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

  iv  Table of Contents ……………………………………………………………………………………………………

  v  List of Tables …………………………………………………………………………………………………………

  ix  List of Figures …………………………………………………………………………………………………………

  x  1 

Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………

1  Background ……………………………………………………………………………………………  1 

2  Objective ………………………………………………………………………………………………

3  Investigation Tool …………………………………………………………………………………

Background …………………………………………………………………………………………………

1  Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………………

2  The Radar System …………………………………………………………………………………

3  Doppler Processing ………………………………………………………………………………

4  Radar Signals…………………………………………………………………………………………

1  Target ………………………………………………………………

2  Clutter ……………………………………………………………………………………

3  Noise ………………………………………………………………………………………  9 

4  Square Law Detector …………………………………………………

5  Radar Signal Environment ……………………………………………………………………

  12 

1 Homogeneous …………………………………………………………………………

  12 

2 Multiple Targets ………………………………………………………………………  13 

3 Clutter Wall ……………………………………………………………………………

  14 

6  About CFAR …………………………………………………………………………………………

  15 

1 Probability of False Alarm ………………………………………………………

2 The CFAR Window ……………………………………………………………………  17 

3 Probability of Detection …………………………………………………………

  18 

4 CFAR Loss …………………………………………………………………………………  19 

7  Monte Carlo Simulations ………………………………………………………………………

  20 

Cell Averaging CFAR …………………………………………………………………………………

  22 

1  Implementation ……………………………………………………………………………………

  22 

2  Homogeneous Environment…………………………………………………………………

  24 

1 Probability of False Alarm…………………………………………………………  24 

2 Detection…………………………………………………………………………………

  25 

3 Multiple Targets………………………………………………………………………………………  27 

4 Clutter Wall……………………………………………………………………………………………  29 

1 Clutter Wall False Alarm……………………………………………………………  29 

2 Clutter Wall Detection………………………………………………………………  31 

5 Summary: CA‐CFAR Advantages and Disadvantages………………………………

  31 

6  A Combat for Multiple Targets: Smallest‐Of Cell Averaging CFAR…

  32 

7  A Remedy for Clutter Walls: Greatest‐Of Cell Averaging CFAR ………………  37 

Variability‐Index  CFAR ……………………………………………………………………………  42 

1  Implementation ……………………………………………………………………………………

  42 

2 VI‐CFAR Decision Logic……………………………………………………………………………  45 

3 Homogeneous Environment……………………………………………………………………  50 

1 Probability of False Alarm…………………………………………………………  50 

2 Probability of Detection……………………………………………………………  51 

4 Masking Targets………………………………………………………………………………………  53 

5 Clutter Wall……………………………………………………………………………………………

  58 

1 Probability of False Alarm…………………………………………………………  58 

2 Probability of Detection……………………………………………………………  59 

Ordered Statistics CFAR ……………………………………………………………………………

  61 

1  Implementation ……………………………………………………………………………………

  61 

2  Homogeneous ………………………………………………………………………………………

  63 

1  Probability of False Alarm ………………………………………………………

  63 

2  Detection…………………………………………………………………………………  63 

3 Multiple Targets………………………………………………………………………………………  66 

5  Clutter Wall …………………………………………………………………………………………

  71 

Ordered Statistics Greatest‐Of CFAR …………………………………………………………  74 

1  Implementation ……………………………………………………………………………………

  74 

2  Homogeneous ………………………………………………………………………………………

  75 

1  Probability of False Alarm ………………………………………………………

  76 

2  Detection…………………………………………………………………………………  77 

3 Multiple Targets………………………………………………………………………………………  79 

5  Clutter Wall …………………………………………………………………………………………

  83 

Conclusions and Final Assessment………………………………………………………………

  86 

References ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………  89  Appendix A  MATLAB Functions …………………………………………………………………………

  90   

1  Radar Return Generation  ……………………………………………………………………

  90 

2  Monte Carlo Simulations  ………………………………………………………………………  92 

3  Neyman Pearson Detection  …………………………………………………………………

  93 

4  Cell Averaging CFAR ………………………………………………………………………………  94 

5  Greatest‐Of Cell Averaging CFAR …………………………………………………………

  97 

6  Smallest‐Of Cell Averaging CFAR ……………………………………………………………  100 

7 Variability‐Index CFAR ……………………………………………………………………………  103 

8  Ordered Statistics CFAR ………………………………………………………………………

  107 

9  Ordered Statistics Greatest‐Of CFAR ……………………………………………………

  110 

  113 

  116 

Appendix B 

MATLAB Scripts ………………………………………………………………………………

  120 

1  Probability of False Alarm in Homogeneous Environment………………………  120 

2  Probability of False Alarm in Clutter Wall Environment…………………………

  125 

3 Probability of Detection in Homogeneous/ Multiple Target Environment

  129 

4 Probability of Detection in Clutter Wall Environment……………………………

  134 

LIST OF TABLES 

Table 2

1 Swerling Targets ………………………………………………………………………………………

  6  Table 2

2 Clutter Types ……………………………………………………………………………………………  8  Table 4

1 VI‐CFAR Decision Logic………………………………………………………………………………  44  Table 7

1 CFAR Comparison………………………………………………………………………………………  86   

LIST OF FIGURES 

Figure 2

 Radar Block Diagram

……………………………………………………………………………

  3  Figure 2

 Doppler Processing…………………………………………………………………………………  5  Figure 2

 Scattering for Different Swerling Targets………………………………………………

  7  Figure 2

 Diode Conductance Characteristic

…………………………………………………………

  11 Figure 2

 Radar Return Statistics Before and After Square Law Detector ………………  11  Figure 2

 Homogeneous Environment……………………………………………………………………  12  Figure 2

 Multiple Targets

 ……………………………………………………………………………………  13  Figure 2

 Clutter Edge……………………………………………………………………………………………  14  Figure 2

 Exponential Distribution and Thresholding

……………………………………………

  16  Figure 2

 CFAR Window………………………………………………………………………………………

  17  Figure 2

 The Threshold

 ……………………………………………………………………………………

  18  Figure 2

 A Typical Probability of Detection Curve illustrating CFAR Loss……………

  19  Figure 2

 Monte Carlo with Exponential Distribution

…………………………………………

  20  Figure 2

 Monte Carlo Weight Function for Exponential Distribution…………………

  21  Figure 3

 Cell Averaging CFAR Block Diagram

……………………………………  22  Figure 3

 CA‐CFAR Threshold in Homogeneous Environment…………………………………  23  Figure 3

 CA‐CFAR Theoretical v

 Experimental PFA

………………………………………………  24  Figure 3

 CA CFAR Homogeneous Probability of Detection

……………………………………  25  Figure 3

 CA CFAR Homogeneous CFAR loss…………………………………………………………

  25  Figure 3

 CA‐CFAR Threshold with 1 Masking Target……………………………………………

  26  Figure 3

 CA‐CFAR Probability of Detection with 1 to 3 masking targets………………

  28 

Figure 3

 CA‐CFAR CFAR Loss  with 1 to 3 masking targets……………………………………

  28  Figure 3

 CA‐CFAR Threshold in Clutter Wall Transition…………………………………………  29  Figure 3

 CA‐CFAR Clutter Wall Probability of False Alarm

…………………………………

  30  Figure 3

 CA‐CFAR Clutter Wall Probability of Detection………………………………………  31  Figure 3

 SOCA‐CFAR Block Diagram……………………………………………………………………

  32  Figure 3

 SOCA‐CFAR Experimental v

 Theoretical PFA…………………………………………  33  Figure 3

 SOCA‐CFAR Homogeneous PD

………………………………………………

  34  Figure 3

 SOCA‐CFAR Homogeneous CFAR Loss …………………………………………………

  34  Figure 3

 SOCA‐CFAR 1 Masking Target Probability of Detection…………………………  35  Figure 3

 SOCA‐CFAR 1 Masking Target CFAR Loss………………………………………………

  35  Figure 3

 SOCA‐CFAR Clutter Wall Probability of False Alarm………………………………  36  Figure 3

 GOCA‐CFAR Block Diagram……………………………………………………………………  37  Figure 3

 GOCA‐CFAR Homogeneous  Probability of False Alarm…………………………  38  Figure 3

 GOCA‐CFAR Homogeneous Probability of Detection……………………………

  39  Figure 3

 GOCA‐CFAR Homogeneous CFAR Loss…………………………………………………

  39  Figure 3

 GOCA‐CFAR Probability of Detection with 1 Masking Target…………………  40  Figure 3

 GOCA‐CFAR CFAR Loss with 1 Masking Target………………………………………  40  Figure 3

 GOCA‐CFAR Clutter Wall PFA

………………………………………………………………

  41  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR Block Diagram……………………………………………………………………………  42  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR ‐ Case I………………………………………………………………………………………  45  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR ‐ Case II………………………………………………………………………………………  46  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR ‐ Case III……………………………………………………………………………………

  47 

Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR ‐ Case IV……………………………………………………………………………………

  48  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR ‐ Case V……………………………………………………………………………………

  49  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR Threshold in Homogeneous Environment…………………………………

  50  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR Theoretical v

 Experimental Homogeneous PFA …………………………  51  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR Probability of Detection Curve …………………………………………………

  52  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR CFAR Loss in Homogeneous Environment………………………………

  52  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR Threshold 1 Masking Target……………………………………………………

  53  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR Probability of Detection with 1 Masking Target………………………

  54  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR PD Curve with varying Numbers of Masking Target…………………

  55  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR CFAR Loss Curve with varying Numbers of Masking Target………  55  Figure 4

 Three Targets………………………………………………………………………………………

  56  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR Probability of Detection with Three Masking Targets………………  57  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR Threshold in Clutter Wall Transition………………………………………  58  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR Clutter Wall Probability of False Alarm

…………………………………

  59  Figure 4

 VI‐CFAR Clutter Wall Probability of Detection

……………………………………

  60  Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR Block Diagram……………………………………

……………………………………  61  Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR Homogeneous PFA

…………………………………

………………………………

  63  Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR Threshold in Homogeneous Environment

………………………………

  64  Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR Homogeneous Probability of Detection……………………………………  65  Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR Homogeneous CFAR Loss …………………………………………………………  65 Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR Resistance to  Multiple Targets …

……………………………………………  66  Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR Threshold with 1 Masking Target

……………………………………………

  67 

Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR Probability of Detection with 1 Masking Target

  68  Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR CFAR Loss with 1 Masking Target ……………………………………………

  69  Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR Probability of Detection with 3 Masking Target

……………………  69  Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR CFAR Loss with 3 Masking Target …………………………………………  70  Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR in Clutter Wall Threshold

………………………………………………………

  71  Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR Clutter Wall Probability of False Alarm……………………………………  72  Figure 5

 OS‐CFAR Clutter Wall Probability of Detection……………………………………

  73  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR Block Diagram

……………………………………………………………………

  74  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR Threshold in Homogeneous Environment……………………………  75  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR Homogeneous PFA

………………………………………………………………  76  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR Homogeneous PD………………………………………………………………

  77  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR Homogeneous CFAR Loss……………………………………………………

  78  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR Resistance to Multiple Targets 

Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR Threshold with 1 Masking Target…………………………………………  79  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR PD with 1 Masking Target……………………………………………………  80  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR CFAR loss with 1 Masking Target…………………………………………  81  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR PD with 3 Masking Target…………………………………………………  82  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR CFAR loss with 3 Masking Target………………………………………  82  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR Threshold in Clutter Wall Transition…………………………………

  83  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR Clutter Wall PFA…………………………………………………………………

  84  Figure 6

 OSGO‐CFAR Clutter Wall PD…………………………………………………………………

  85  Figure 7

1 CFAR Obstacle Course……………………………………

………………………………………

  88 

CHAPTER 1  Introduction  1

1  Background   

Radar return is often a mix of noise

 clutter

 and, if present, targets

 A key com‐

ponent in RADAR processing is the setting of detection thresholds

 These thresholds  differentiate between targets of interest and unwanted radar returns

 As operating en‐ vironments and conditions change, the amount and nature of noise and clutter also  change

 For accurate and reliable detection, the threshold must self‐adjust dynamically  and intelligently

CFAR, constant false alarm rate, represents a key technique in adaptively set‐

ting target detection threshold [1]

 Employing a moving window, across range bins of  data, CFAR algorithms look at neighborhoods of power returns in the estimate of the  noise or clutter mean

 By scaling the estimated mean with a pre‐calculated multiplier,  the threshold is set as to limit false alarms to a desired rate

CFAR algorithms are assessed for their abilities to maintain desired probabilities 

of detections (PD) and their probabilities of false alarm (PFA)

 The probability of detec‐ tion describes the chances of successfully declaring a target, when a target is actually  present

 The probability of false alarm describes the odds of incorrectly declaring a tar‐ get, when the signal is, in actuality, noise or clutter

Developed CFAR algorithms must be able to operate in a variety of canonical 

environments: homogeneous, multiple targets, and clutter wall

 In the homogeneous  environment, a single target exists in a sea of clutter or noise of uniform noise

 In the 

multiple target exists, several targets exist in close proximity to one another

 In the  clutter wall environment, noise and/or clutter power experiences sudden, discontinu‐ ous increases or decreases

    1

2   Objective   

The goal of this study is to investigate and assess the variety of existing CFAR 

algorithms and judging  their performance in homogeneous, multiple target, and clut‐ ter wall environments

 Towards this, the Ordered Statistics Greatest‐Of CFAR (OSGO‐ CFAR), Variability Index CFAR (VI‐CFAR), and Switching CFAR (S‐CFAR) are studied

  While Cell Averaging CFAR (CA‐CFAR) and Ordered Statistics CFAR (OS‐CFAR) are also  looked at, they are used primarily as basis of comparisons for the algorithms of inter‐ est

 We end with development of our own CFAR technique, Switching Variability Index  CFAR (SVI‐CFAR) that represents a hybrid approach between VI‐CFAR and S‐CFAR

    1

3  Investigation Tool   

Radar signals and CFAR algorithms are assessed through Monte Carlo, numeri‐

 MATLAB was chosen as the investigation tool (Version 7

CHAPTER 2  Background  2

1  Introduction   

Since their development during World War II, radar had grown to occupy criti‐

cal civilian and military roles

 An introductory  understanding of radar processing and  signals is necessary before getting into the analysis and assessment of CFAR algo‐ rithms

     2

2   The Radar System   

Originally acronymic as RADAR— for RAdio Detection And Ranging, common 

usage had established the word in its own right, as radar— a free‐standing noun

 The  original word, though, helps remind of the technology’s dual purpose: To detect tar‐ gets of interests and to ascertain their distance

Figure 2

 Radar Block Diagram

Figure 2

1 shows a basic block diagram of a RADAR system

 The particular sys‐

tem is monostatic— where a single antenna is multiplexed for both transmission and  reception [2]

The waveform generator forms a timing pulse to trigger the transmitter to send 

an electromagnetic pulse at a designed frequency

 As this pulse is sent it, it will en‐ counter different objects at varying distances, and these objects will scatter back some  of these pulses back to the antenna

The timing and frequency of the return pulse corresponds to the relatives 

speeds and distance of the reflected target

 The subsequent processing blocks— the  A/D converter, the pulse compression, and the Doppler processor all helps extract the  relevant information

Pulse repetition interval (PRI) refers to the period of time before the successive 

 Pulse repetition frequency (PRF) is simply the inverse of the PRI

 During  the period between successive pulses, during a given pulse repetition interval, the ra‐ dar system waits for back‐echoed pulses

 Detected echoes are detected, binned and  stored

The amount of time a sent pulse is reflected back to the radar antenna is di‐

rectly proportional to the distance of the reflector:  ct R 0   2 R : range (distance)   c'0 : speed of light t: time       4 

Figure 2

 Doppler Processing

3  Doppler Processing   

With doppler processing, a radar system can not only detect target range and 

location, but also the radial velocity, the range rate

A single target may be looked at several times over several pulse intervals 

 The 

change in power over a given range bin, or distance, across many pulse intervals may  give a sense of the doppler shift, and hence, the speed of the target (Figure 2

When discrete Fourier transform (DFT), through fast fourier transform (FFT), is 

performed on each range sample over its many range intervals, the pulse intervals are  converted to doppler intervals (also called doppler bins)

4  Radar Signals   

Radar signals are often composed of unwanted noise, undesired clutter returns, 

 Over a short period of time, each signal elements possesses its  own stochastic distribution with a given power

 Statistical characteristics of the signals  change as they pass through a square law detector

    2

1 Target   

The power of a radar return depends on the distance and the effective radar 

cross section (RCS) of the target

 Over distance r, the power of the signal diminishes by  a factor r4

 Many factors of the radar, the target, and the operating environment come  together to determine the target’s RCS: the illumination angle, the frequency, the po‐ larization of the transmitted wave, target motion, vibration, and kinematics of the ra‐ dar itself

 Rather than hopelessly describing a target’s RCS deterministically, they’re  characterizing stochastically

Building upon Marcum’s pioneering studies, Peter Swerling developed four ca‐

nonical stochastic models: Swerling I, II, III, and IV

 With these Swerling models, the re‐

Table 2

 Swerling Targets  Model  Swerling I 

Distribution   Rayleigh 

Swerling II  Swerling III  Swerling IV 

Notes 

Scan‐to‐scan 

Characterizes well targets like  planes, with many independent  Pulse‐to‐Pulse  reflectors 

Characterizes well targets like  Chi‐Squared    2 x Scan‐to‐scan   frigates, with one strong reflector  (Four degrees  p  x   4 x e  av Pulse‐to‐Pulse  and many smaller, weaker inde‐ of freedom)   2 av pendent reflectors 

Swerling V  Non‐fluctuating  

Also called Swerling 0 or  Marcum’s Model  6 

: Many scatter elements

 each of  approximately equal amplitudes

: One scattering element producing  an amplitude much larger than other  elements

Figure 2

 Scattering for Different Swerling Targets

  The Swerling models assumes each tar‐ get composed of a large number of independent scatters

    (a)  Swerling I/II

 For Swerling  targets I and II, none of the independent scattering elements dominates:  their reflected powers is comparable to one another

  (b)  Swerling III/IV

 For Swerling  targets III and IV, there is a single dominant non‐fluctuating scatter  together with other smaller scatters

turn power of a target will fluctuate— randomly increase and decrease— with a char‐ acteristic probability density function (PDF) with either quickly or slowly (Table 2

    

The Swerling I and II models both characterized  with a  Rayleigh distribution 

and assumed to be  composed of many independent small reflectors

 and with none  dominating, they each return radar signals of about the same power

 Swerling I models  fluctuate slowly— from scan‐to‐scan (Figure 2

 Each pulse return is highly corre‐ lated

 Swerling II models, meanwhile, fluctuate quickly— varying from pulse‐to‐pulse

 It  is claimed that observed data on airborne aircraft targets agree with Swerling Models I  and II

Swerling III and IV models are described by the Chi‐squared distribution with 

 They are conceptualized as many independent reflectors of  roughly equal amplitude with one dominating reflector (Figure 2

 The Swerling III  model varies slowly— from scan to scan while the Swerling IV model fluctuates  7 

quickly— from pulse to pulse

 The Swerling III/IV model is said to well‐characterize a  frigate or corvette with one large target but with complex superstructures

    2

2 Clutter   

Clutter is unwanted radar returns

 They may be a echoes from the environ‐

ment— as from ground, mountain, sea— or objects of no importance— as a flock of  geese

 Designation of clutter changes with the aims and designs of the radar system

 A  doppler weather system, for instance, may regard radar returns from a storm cloud  with prime importance while the same cloud may only be interference to a civilian air  traffic control radar

 The stochastic characteristic of clutter varies with the operating  parameters of the radar as well as the nature of the clutter source (Table 2

Older radar systems had longer pulse repetition intervals and larger range bins

It was observed that ground clutter was well characterized with a Gaussian distribu‐ tion

 However, as technology improved, and shorter pulse repetition intervals gave  greater range resolution, large spikes in amplitude were observed in radar data

 The 

Table 2

 Clutter Types  Model 

Application 

Equation 

Gaussian 

Clouds 

Weibull Clutter 

Land Clutter 

K‐distribution 

Sea Clutter 

  x   2  exp     2   2 2   2   1

  x c      b  

 exp   

Gaussian distribution no longer fitted

Studies during the late 70’s and early 80’s found that ground clutter were more 

accurately characterized with a Weibull distribution

 Unlike the Gaussian distribution,  the Weibull is characterized by two variables: a shaping coefficient and a mean coeffi‐ cient

In contrast with ground clutter, sea clutter is highly correlated

 The two‐

parameter k‐distribution well‐characterizes this

    2

3 Noise   

Gaussian white noise results from random thermal motion in electronic sys‐

 Unlike target and clutter returns, noise is always present

  As implied by its  name, Gaussian noise is characterized by the bell‐shaped Gaussian distribution

    2

4 Square Law Detector   

The stochastic characteristic of received radar signals may change at the diode 

 The diode conductance characteristic is shown figure 2

 Depending on the  strength of the received signal, the detector may either operate in the conductance  square or in the linear region

 Each offers its advantages

 Marcum showed that if the  signal is low, lying below the conductance knee, the square law detector gave the best  results

 Linear detectors, meanwhile,  offers the greatest dynamic range and is best for  high signals

 Mathematically, in analysis, the square law detector offers additional ad‐ vantages

Both Rayleigh and Gaussian PDF’s, passing through the square law detector, 

become exponential distributions (Figure 2

 Given the relative simplicity of integra‐ tion of the exponential function, this fact comes in handy in analytical treatments of  target detection and false alarm rates

Figure 2

 Diode Conductance Characteristic

  Radar detection can  either occur in the linear or the square region of the diode

Figure 2

 Radar Return Statistics Before and After Square Law Detector 

  The square law  detector changes stochastic PDF of the signal

    (a)  Gaussian Distribution

 For Swerling  targets I and II, none of the independent scattering elements  dominates: their reflected powers is comparable to one another

  (b)  Exponential Distribution

 For Swerling  targets III and IV, there is a single dominant non‐fluctuating  scatter together with other smaller scatters

Magnitude

Magnitude

Figure 2

 Homogeneous Environment  (a) There is just one target of power 25dB at range gate 37

 The noise power is uniform at 5dB

  (b) MATLAB simulation of homogeneous environment

5 Radar Signal Environment   

A number of different simplified RADAR environments have been used to assess 

and judge the efficacy and applicability of the various CFAR algorithm

  Although no  one model captures the full complexity and nuance of actual operating conditions, they  each test important qualities of the CFAR algorithm: The homogeneous environment,  the multiple target environment, and the clutter edge environment

    2

1 Homogeneous   

The homogeneous environment is the most straight‐forward: It assumes a sin‐

gle target against an independent and identically distributed (iid) noise or clutter  (Figure 2

A homogeneous environment may arise when, for instance, the radar antenna 

makes no detection, and noise of a uniform power dominates the range bins

 or when  12 

Magnitude

Magnitude

Figure 2

 Multiple Targets

   (a) At range gates 37 and 42, there are targets of power 25dB

  (b) MATLAB simulation of multiple targets with exponential distribution

the clutter return over a great stretch of distance is of a constant environment (say, a  forest, mountain, or ocean)

The homogeneous model assesses the ability of various CFAR algorithms as the 

simplest test for properly assessing its ability to estimate the noise/clutter mean in set‐ ting the threshold of detection

     2

2 Multiple Targets   

Targets of interest, however, don’t always exist in isolation along the range 

gates of a given doppler bin

 By chance or design, targets may be within close proximity  of one another (Figure 2

Some CFAR algorithms suffer serious performative decline in multiple target 

 When the targets are within half a window length of one another, their high  powers, improperly elevates the estimated mean of the background noise/clutter

  13 

Magnitude

Magnitude

Clutter 45

Figure 2

 Clutter Edge

   (a) At range gate 41, there is a sudden jump in clutter power

 from 5dB to 10dB

  (b) MATLAB simulation of a clutter edge with exponential distribution

When the resulting thresholds are set, they are higher than they lead to be, and result  in losses in probability of detection (PD)

    2

3 Clutter Wall   

In addition to one‐target assumption, the iid assumption of the background 

noise/clutter may also be violated

 Radar environments often undergo abrupt changes  in power— such as transitioning from clear land to a forest, or from clouds to the clear  sky

 These sudden jumps in mean power may throw off the CFAR algorithm, and intol‐ erably increase the probability of false alarm following the upward clutter wall transi‐ tion or decrease the probability of detection right before the clutter wall (Figure 2

6 About CFAR   

The goal of CFAR— constant false alarm rate— algorithms is to set thresholds 

high enough to limit false alarms to a tolerable rate, but low enough to allow target  detection

 In the past, this differentiation between target and background noise and  clutter were done by human radar operators upon a radar display screen

 However,  with the advent of computer technology, detection thresholding was able to be auto‐ mated, and thus bypassing much of the cost, inefficiencies, and limitations of a human  operator

    2

1 Probability of False Alarm   

The probability of false alarm, PFA, is the chance that spikes in noise or clutter is 

mistaken by the CFAR algorithm as a target

 As noise and clutter distributions are con‐ tinuous, extending from amplitudes very close to zero to amplitudes extending infi‐ nitely outwards

 No matter how high thresholds are set, there will always be a finite  chance of random noise or clutter exceeding that threshold

 So rather than eliminating  false alarms all together (this would be impossible), the goal of CFAR algorithms is to  reliably estimate the mean noise, and scaling the estimated mean by a multiplier to  obtain the threshold set high enough to limit false alarm rate to a tolerably small rate

In many operating environments, the shape of the noise/clutter is known a 

 From off‐line computation or from the experience of the engineering, the prob‐ ability density function (PDF) of the noise can be known ahead of time

 For instance,  land clutter is often‐characterized by the Weibull distribution and Clouds by the Gaus‐

Probability Distribution 

Probability of  False Alarm 

Threshold 

Noise Power 

Threshold

Threshold Multiplier

 Exponential Distribution and Thresholding

   (a) Exponential PDF

  (b) To get the threshold, the mean is scaled by a threshold multiplier

Knowing the distribution, then, a measurement of the mean may be properly 

scaled with a threshold multiplier for a threshold that yields the desired probability of  false alarm (Figure 2

9)   

So the question becomes: How to estimate the mean noise or clutter over sev‐

? The answer: The CFAR window      

Cell Under Test

Leading Window

Guard Cells

Lagging Window

Figure 2

 CFAR Window 

2 The CFAR Window   

To estimate the mean noise/clutter present in a specific range bin, other local 

 Towards this end, most CFAR algorithms utilizes a moving window

  There are several components to the CFAR window (Figure 2

The cell under test (CUT)— also called the test cell— is the range bin with which 

the mean noise/clutter is estimated and with which the threshold is set

To estimate the mean, references cells— cells local to the CUT— are used

 Dif‐

ferent CFAR algorithms utilize different mathematical assessments and different deci‐ sions logical towards this end

 Cell averaging CFAR, for instance, takes the mean of the  reference cells while Ordered Statistics CFAR orders the reference cells from smallest  to largest to take the kth largest as representative of the average noise

Guard cells are optional and may be variable in length

 A target, if present in 

the CUT, may straddle consecutive

 and this would lead to inaccurate estimates of the  noise

 Guard cells then, would guarantee then, guard against this

 Typically, one guard  cell is used to either side of the CUT

Threshold Recieved Waveform

Missed Detection 

Magnitude (dB)

Detection

Figure 2

 The Threshold

   (a) Missed detection

 The target power falls underneath the threshold

  (b) Successful detection

 Target power greater than threshold

3 Probability of Detection   

The CFAR reference window is used to set the threshold (Figure 2

 The 

threshold helps differentiate between target a noise

 If the signal power, for a given  range cell, lies underneath the threshold, a target is deemed absent

 If the same signal  power exceeds the height of the threshold, then a target is declared present

Since target powers are typically stochastic— with a  Swerling I/II or Swerlign 

III/IV distribution— the probability of detection is also stochastic

 Around a mean  value, the received target power would fluctuate to larger than the mean or smaller  than the mean according to its characteristic PDF

 Sometimes, it would flucturate as  low as to miss the mean

 So regardless to how well the threshold is set for a given  probability of false alarm, there will always be the chance of missing a target, if it’s pre‐ sent

 The probability of detection helps characterize the odds of detection over many  trial runs or over many looks

  18 

Probability of Detection

Probability of Detection

CFAR Loss 

Neyman-Pearson CA-CFAR

Figure 2

 A Typical Probability of Detection Curve illustrating CFAR Loss 

4 CFAR Loss   

Although the PD is a good measure of CFAR performance, it is relative to operat‐

ing conditions like the signal to noise ratio (SNR)

 So rather than PD, CFAR loss is the  usual ruler used to judge CFAR performance

Figure 12

 As the SNR in‐

creases, the probability of detection also increases

 The Neyman‐Pearson detector  represents the theoretical best detection— if perfect knowledge of the mean noise is  known a priori

 It is against the Neyman‐Pearson detector that the CFAR loss is calcu‐ lated

CFAR loss is the SNR difference, for a given PD between the Neyman‐Pearson 

detector and the CFAR algorithm in interest

 For instance, in Figure 12

  19 

 x  exp   2    

 x  exp   2   m  

Q   f  x dx  PFA  10 106 Th

Figure 2

 Monte Carlo with Exponential Distribution

7 Monte Carlo Simulations   

Frequently, desired probability of false alarms are very small— on the order of 

 Then, in MATLAB, during a CFAR numerical experiment, a great number of  trial runs— on the order of 108 or 109— are necessary before a reliable experimental  probability of false alarm can be ascertained

 This often intolerably  increases MATLAB  run‐time or computer memory demands

 Monte Carlo Importance Sampling repre‐ sents a class of numerical techniques used to reliably simulate very rare events [3]

    

Rather than using the original distribution to simulate events, with Monte Carlo 

Importance Sampling, a similar function but with a different mean is used, but with the  same threshold (Figure 2

 Any successful hits, then, with the new similar function,  rather than having a weight of one, is fractionally weight with a pre‐derived equation  (Figure 2

 m2 1     1 exp    2  2  x  2   m      w  x  : The weighing function for successful Monte Carlo "hits" x : Random varaible with uniform distribution

 2 : Variance of the estimated exponential distribution  m 2 : Variance of the Monte Carlo exponential distribution Figure 2

 Monte Carlo Weight Function for Exponential Distribution

Chapter 3  Cell Averaging CFAR   

Cell Averaging CFAR (CA‐CFAR) was developed early on, in 1947, by Howard 

Finn [1]

 Of all the CFAR algorithms, CA‐CFAR works best in a homogeneous environ‐ ment

 With increasing window size, the probability of detection for CA‐CFAR ap‐ proaches that  of the optimal Neyman‐Pearson detector

However, when the homogeneous assumptions are violated, the performance 

of CA‐CFAR rapidly deteriorates [4]

  As a  starting point in algorithmic development  and as a basis of comparison, the algorithm is studied here

    3

1 Implementation   

In Cell Averaging CFAR, every reference cell is added together and multiplied to 

the threshold multiplier (Figure 3

 For Gaussian noise and a square law detector, the 

Threshold

Threshold Multiplier

Figure 3

 Cell Averaging CFAR Block Diagram

threshold multiplier is given by:   

Variable α is the threshold‐multiplier, N is the total number of reference cells, and PFA  is the desired probability of false alarm

Typically, PFA is designed to be very low, on the order of 10‐5 or 10‐6

 The refer‐

ence window length, N, must be selected by the designer as a balance of performance  in homogeneous and heterogeneous environments

    

A cell averaging threshold with PFA = 10‐4 and N = 32 is simulated for a single‐

target in a homogeneous environment (Figure 3

 A single target Swerling I/II target is  in range bin 37 in homogeneous noise

 SNR is set to 15dB

 We see that the threshold, 

Magnitude (dB)

Figure 3

 CA‐CFAR Threshold in Homogeneous Environment

across the noise‐only range bin, makes good clearance from the noise

 There is a suc‐ cessful detection at the target

 To either sides of the target in range bin 37 are elevated  threshold plateau— these are artifacts from target presence

 This is a characteristic of  CA‐CFAR

 Although it poses no problems in the single‐target homogeneous environ‐ ment case, with multiple targets, it negatively effects PD

    3

2 Homogeneous Environment  3

1 Probability of False Alarm   

The primary function of any CFAR is to set the threshold to maintain the desired 

  To confirm the workability of the algorithm in a homogene‐ ous environment, we performed 10,000 trials for various designed PFA  (Figure 3

 The  experimental PFA closely matched the expected theoretical results

Probability of False Alarm

Theoretical PFA Experimental P FA

Figure 3

 CA‐CFAR Theoretical v

 Experimental PFA

2 Detection   

Cell Averaging CFAR successfully sets thresholds to keep to desired false alarm 

rates, but does this same threshold allow for good probability of detection

? We first  look at CA‐CFAR in a homogeneous environment— with a single target in a background  of noise or clutter with uniform mean 

 The threshold was set for a single trial run in  figure 3

 In figure 3

  For this data set, the CA‐CFAR window size was set to 32,  and a million trial per SNR  was performed

 The CA‐CFAR PD curve closely matches to the contours of the Neyman‐ Pearson detector

 In figure 3

     

Probability of Detection

Figure 3

 CA‐CFAR Homogeneous Probability of Detection

5 CA-CFAR

CFAR Loss (dB)