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26 "

Restricted Operator Certificate"

Description

E SUB-COMMITTEE ON HUMAN ELEMENT,

TRAINING AND WATCHKEEPING 1st session Agenda item 3

HTW 1/3/5 21 November 2013 Original: ENGLISH

VALIDATION OF MODEL TRAINING COURSES Model course – Restricted Operator's Certificate for GMDSS Note by the Secretariat SUMMARY Executive summary:

This document provides the draft of a revised model course on Restricted Operator's Certificate for GMDSS

Strategic direction:

High-level action:

Planned output:

Action to be taken:

Paragraph 3

Related document: STW 40/14 1 Attached in the annex is a revised draft model course on Restricted Operator's Certificate for GMDSS

Due to time constraints,

any comments received on the draft course from the validation panel will be provided directly to the Sub-Committee

Action requested of the Sub-Committee 3 The Sub-Committee is invited to consider the above information and take action,

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

DRAFT MODEL COURSE ON RESTRICTED OPERATOR'S CERTIFICATE FOR GMDSS

MODEL COURSE 1

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Model Course on ROC for the GMDSS is based on the Radio Regulations Edition 2012 and SOLAS 1974 as amended

It has been compiled by Mrs

Simone Wilde,

Andreas Braun and Mr

Dietrich Kaun under direction of the Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH) in co-operation with Mrs

Brunhild Osterhues from University of Applied Science Bremen

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Contents INTRODUCTION

COMPENDIUM (see separate Contents)

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Introduction to model courses Purpose of the model courses The purpose of the IMO model courses are to assist maritime training institutes and their teaching staff in organizing and introducing new training courses or in enhancing,

updating or supplementing existing training material where the quality and effectiveness of the training courses may thereby be improved

It is not the intention of the model course programme to present instructors with a rigid "teaching package" which they are expected to "follow blindly"

Nor is it the intention to substitute audio-visual or "programmed" material for the instructor's presence

As in all training endeavours,

skills and dedication of the instructor are the key components in the transfer of knowledge and skills to those being trained through IMO model course material

Because educational systems and the cultural backgrounds of trainees in maritime subjects vary considerably from country to country,

the model course material has been designed to identify the basic entry requirements and trainee target group for each course in universally applicable terms,

and to specify clearly the technical content and levels of knowledge and skill necessary to meet the intent of IMO conventions and related recommendations

Use of the model course To use the model course the instructor should review the course plan and detailed syllabus,

taking into account the information provided under the entry standards specified in the course framework

The actual level of knowledge and skills and the prior technical education of the trainees should be kept in mind during this review,

and any areas within the detailed syllabus which may cause difficulties because of differences between the actual trainee entry level and that assumed by the course designer should be identified

To compensate for such differences,

the instructor is expected to delete from the course,

items dealing with knowledge or skills already attained by the trainees

He should also identify any academic knowledge,

skills or technical training which they may not have previously acquired

By analysing the detailed syllabus and the academic knowledge required to allow training in the technical area to proceed,

the instructor can design an appropriate preentry course or,

insert the elements of academic knowledge required to support the technical training elements concerned at appropriate points within the technical course

Adjustment of the course objectives,

scope and content may also be necessary if in your maritime industry the trainees completing the course are to undertake duties which differ from the course objectives specified in the model course

By analysing the detailed syllabus and the academic knowledge required to allow training in the technical area to proceed,

the instructor can design an appropriate preI:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

insert the elements of academic knowledge required to support the technical training elements concerned at appropriate points within the technical course (ref

Within the course plan the course designers have indicated their assessment of the time that should be allotted to each learning area

However,

it must be appreciated that these allocations are arbitrary and assume that the trainees have fully met all entry requirements of the course

The instructor should therefore review these assessments and may need to re-allocate the time required to achieve each specific learning objective

Lesson Plans Having adjusted the course content to suit the trainee intake and any revision of the course objectives,

the instructor should draw up lesson plans based on the detailed syllabus

The detailed syllabus contains specific references to the textbooks or teaching material proposed for use in the course

Where no adjustment has been found necessary in the learning objectives of the detailed syllabus,

the lesson plans may simply consist of the detailed syllabus with keywords or other reminders added to assist the instructor in making his presentation of the material

Presentation The presentation of concepts and methodologies must be repeated in various ways until the instructor is satisfied that the trainee has attained each specified learning objective

The syllabus is laid out in learning-objective format and each objective specifies what the trainee must be able to perform as the learning outcome

Implementation For the course to run smoothly and to be effective,

considerable attention must be paid to the availability and use of:     

Properly qualified instructors Support staff Rooms and other spaces Real equipment GMDSS communication simulator,

with Touchscreens and PTT working in a network  Textbooks,

technical papers  Other reference material Thorough preparation is the key to successful implementation of the course

The IMO has produced "Guidance on the Implementation of IMO Model Courses," which deals with this aspect in greater detail

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

PART A: Course Framework Scope This course covers the training recommendations in annex 3 to the IMO Assembly resolution A

703 (17)

The course is revised to meet the Radio Regulations 2012

Objective A trainee successfully completing this course and passing the prescribed examination should be able to efficiently operate the GMDSS equipment,

and to have primary responsibility to radio communications during distress-,

Given the number of severe problems being experienced in the GMDSS as a result of the large amount of false Distress alerts that sometimes occur,

training will also be provided in techniques to avoid the unintentional transmission of false Distress alerts and the procedures to use in order to mitigate the effects of false Distress alerts following unintentional transmission

Entry standards This course framework requires a little knowledge of maritime radio communication practice,

but a working knowledge of English as a second language

Elementary computer skills are assumed in the recommended course timetable

Candidates are assumed to have basic computer skills in order to participate in the course

However additional computer skills training will be required by candidates without any basic proficiency in the use of computers

Certification Every person in charge of or performing radio duties on a ship that is required to participate in the GMDSS is required to hold an appropriate GMDSS certificate,

which satisfies the provisions of the Radio Regulations of the International Telecommunication Union (ref

ITU RR Art

In addition,

every candidate for certification in accordance with the International Convention on Standards of Training,

Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers,

for service on a ship which is required to have a radio installation by the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea,

shall not be less than 18 years of age,

and have completed an approved education and training and shall meet the standard of competence specified in section A-IV/2 of the STCW Code

The material contained in this course covers all aspects of training in GMDSS radio communications

However,

where the additional requirements for certification under the STCW-Convention contained in column 2 of table A-IV/2 of the STCW Code are not examined as part of the national qualification requirements for a certificate issued under the Radio Regulations,

the appropriate provisions for training and assessment contained in section A-IV/2 of the STCW Code will have to be met separately

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

The examination must be supervised by an independent,

objective examiner [usually a qualified representative from the Administration,

Port Captain's Office or likewise (STCW-Convention,

Section A-I/6,

A-I/7 and A-I/8)]

Course intake limitations The maximum number of trainees should depend on the facilities and equipment available,

bearing in mind the scope and objectives of this course

The instructor trainee ratio should be limited to 1:12

When a class size exceeds 12 trainees,

an assistant instructor is required

Practical training should be undertaken in small groups of not more than 8 trainees,

depending on the available equipment

The recommendations for facilities and equipment for this course are based on a total number of 12 trainees and corresponding instructor capacity (most academies,

colleges or maritime education institutions recommend 8 students per instructor)

The use of GMDSS simulators to supplement training on real equipment may allow greater numbers to be accommodated without sacrificing training standards

However,

the course co-ordinator will have to ensure that the timetable arrangements still provide sufficient access to real GMDSS equipment

Note also the arrangements needed for examination and assessment listed under column 3 of table A-IV/2 of the STCW Code

Staff requirements The following are the minimum qualifications recommended for instructors presenting a course that follows the IMO Model Course 1

The instructor in charge shall: – be properly qualified in the subject matter

– be in possession of a valid General Operator's Certificate issued by an IMO white list flag state

– have considerable experience in maritime radio communications,

also a good general knowledge of ships,

Urgency Safety and Routine communications as well as Search and Rescue matters

– have completed type specific familiarization relevant to the equipment used for training

– have a current relevant teaching qualification or have successfully completed a Train-The-Trainer course,

including the application of simulators in training and meets the requirements of STCW regulation I/6 and I/12

Teaching facilities and equipment (for example) GMDSS simulation equipment must meet all applicable performance standards set out in Regulation I/12 of the STCW-Convention

The lecture portion of the course should take place in any suitable classroom with adequate desk/seating space for all trainees

Standard classroom facilities must be available such as whiteboard/chalkboard,

appropriate projection system,

For practical training,

adequate working space and separate parallel working areas are recommended

The following equipment is the minimum recommended:

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

– Two fully operational VHF transmitter/receivers for radiotelephony and DSC,

incorporating a DSC watch receiver for channel 70 (it should be possible to go on the air with one of them)

– One dummy satellite EPIRB (406 MHz) with hydrostatic release mechanism

– One EGC receiver facility (An Inmarsat-C covers that requirement on board)

MF-DSC and Inmarsat-C

– One two-way portable VHF radiotelephone with charging arrangement

– One portable two-way on-scene communication for 121,5 and 123,1 MHz (dummy)

– One training network with personal computers,

touchscreens and PTTs with realistic simulation equipment should be provided for each trainee,

capable of running relevant programmes for simulating the operation of VHF-DSC,

– One battery inverter power supply,

connected as the reserve source of energy (not necessarily located in the working area) or a regular reserve source of energy (radio batteries) connected to the charging arrangement (re

and – Sign and marking in accordance with the requirements of the administrations for GMDSS ship stations

Note GMDSS training equipment (real equipment) should be installed in such a way that it corresponds with the requirements of installation on board GMDSS vessels

The standard should be set at the Training Institutions and not on board

Note GMDSS training simulators have to provide all communication requirements

This means,

that the simulator should simulate the features of the designated simulated equipment in distress-,

It must be possible to simulate the contact to ship stations as well as to all kinds of coast stations in a network of computers

Note Throughout the course,

safe working practices are to be clearly defined and emphasized with reference to current international requirements and regulations

Two sets of equipment would prove advantageous

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Teaching aids (A) A1 ROC Model Course Compendium A2 PC programme in a network,

for the simulation of: 1 Inmarsat-C for EGC reception 2 Digital Selective Calling (VHF-DSC) 3 Navtex A3 User manuals for all installed or simulated GMDSS equipment A4 Log-book A5 Demonstration equipment (SARTs,

portable two-way onscene Communication VHF for 121,5 and 123,1 MHz and EPIRBs) A6 Real equipment as VHF Handheld,

VHF-DSC,

Inmarsat-C (SARTs,

EPIRBs,

Communication set for 121,5 and 123,2 MHz and alarm panel for passenger ships = dummies) IMO and ITU References (R) R1 GMDSS Handbook R2 IAMSAR Manual R3 Standard Marine Communication Phrases R4 International Code of Signals – (INTERCO) R5 Master Plan of the shore-based facilities for the GMDSS R6 STCW-Convention R7 IMO Resolution A

as amended (SOLAS) R9 Radio Regulations (RR),

as amended R10 Recommendation ITU-R M

Textbooks (T) T1 T2 1 2 T3 1 2 3 4 5 6

ITU Manual for Use by the Maritime Mobile and Maritime Mobile-Satellite Services ITU List of Coast Stations and Special Service Stations (List IV) ITU List of Ship Stations and Maritime Mobile Service Identity Assignments (List V) Inmarsat Maritime Communications Handbook Harmonization of GMDSS requirements for radio installations on board SOLAS-ships (COMSAR/Circ

Volume 5,

Note It is expected that the national education institution implementing the course will insert references to national requirements and regulations as necessary

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Availability of publications Information Sources: The following contacts may be helpful in obtaining reference documents mentioned in this Manual

International documents are available in the official languages of the sponsoring organizations

The organization's website should have the most current contact information such as telephone,

IMO Publishing 4 Albert Embankment London SE1 7SR United Kingdom

Website: www

org E-mail: [email protected]

International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Bureau des radiocommunications (BR) Place des Nations CH-1211 Genève 20 Switzerland

Website: www

int/ITU-R/ E-mail: [email protected]

International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) 999 University Street Montreal,

Quebec Canada H3C 5H7

Website: www

int E-mail: [email protected]

Inmarsat 99 City Road London EC1Y 1AX United Kingdom

Website: www

com E-mail: [email protected]

International Cospas-Sarsat Programme 700 de la Gauchetière West,

Suite 2450 Montreal,

Quebec H3B 5M2 Canada

Website: www

org E-mail: [email protected]

Centro Internazionale Radio-Medico (CIRM) Viale dell'Architettura,

Website: www

Amver Maritime Relations 1 South Street USCG Battery Park Building New York,

NY 10004 United States

Website: www

Global Positioning System (GPS) U

Coast Guard NAVCEN MS 7310 7323 Telegraph Road Alexandria,

VA 20598-7310 United States

Website: www

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

PART B: Course Outline and Timetable Overview The following section presents the topics of the 48-hour ROC course in a simplified outline format

The topics are organized into 9 general subject areas

The total hours are allocated in the following manner: Practice

Lecture

Examination

3,0 hrs

The duration allocated to each topic is presented in the Course Timetables,

and is repeated in Part C – Detailed Teaching Syllabus

The Learning Objectives for each topic are presented generally in Part C,

and with full detail in the compendium

As defined in Part A – Course Framework,

the Classroom setting should provide one workstation for each trainee,

and all workstations should be networked to the simulation instructor and server

Course Outline

Subject Area

Introduction

The statutory framework of the Maritime Mobile Service

International Convention of Safety of Life at See 2

Radio Regulations

Identification of Radio Stations 3

Identification of Ship Stations 3

Identification of Coast Stations 3

Identification of Search and Rescue Stations 3

Identification of Vessel Traffic Service Stations 3

Identification of Aids to Navigation 3

Identification of Aircraft Stations 3

Identification of associated craft with parent ship

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Subject Area

Service Publications

List of Coast Stations and Special Service Stations (ITU List IV) 4

List of Ship Stations and Maritime Mobile Service Identity Assignments (ITU List V) 4

Manual for use by the Maritime Mobile and Maritime MobileSatellite Services 4

Admiralty List of Radio Signals

Technical

Radio wave propagation 5

Modulation basics 5

Transmitter and receiver basics 5

Batteries 5

Antennas 5

DSC basics 5

Fault location and service on GMDSS marine electronic equipment

GMDSS Components 6

General 6

VHF DSC 6

VHF Voice Procedure 6

Inmarsat 6

Cospas / Sarsat 6

EPIRB 6

Search and Rescue Transponder / Transmitter (SART) 6

Maritime safety Information 6

The use and functions of portable VHF radio 6

Portable VHF aeronautical radio for 121,5 and 123,1 MHz

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Subject Area 7

Other Systems used on board

Ultra High Frequency Handhelds 7

Automatic Identification System 7

Ship Security Alert System

Search and Rescue (SAR) operation

The role of the Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centre 8

International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue (IAMSAR) Manual 8

The role and method of use of ship reporting systems

Miscellaneous skills and operational procedures for general communications 9

Use of English communications

Procedure of traffic charging Examination A

Theoretical Examination

Practical Examination

Providing that the learning objectives contained in part C of this course are fully achieved,

the course timetable may be adjusted to suit course entry requirements based on different standards of prior knowledge in radio- communications or seagoing experience

In addition,

any adjustment should take into account the need to maintain an effective instructor to student ratio and adequate access to GMDSS equipment for practical training during course

Some instructors consider the course programme to be quite complex and some administrations have decided that 48 hours is a minimum amount of hours,

in spite of the student's background

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

PART C: Detailed Teaching Syllabus The detailed teaching syllabus has been written in learning-objective format in which the objective describes what the trainee must do to demonstrate that knowledge has been transferred

All objectives are understood to be prefixed by the words,

"The expected learning outcome is that the trainee…" In order to assist the instructor,

references are shown against the learning objectives to indicated IMO references and publications,

additional technical material and teaching aids which the instructor may wish to use when preparing course material

The material listed in the course framework has been used to structure the detailed teaching syllabus

– Teaching aids (indicated by A) – IMO and ITU references (indicated by R) – Textbooks (indicated by T)

Abbreviations used in the detailed teaching syllabus are: – – – – – – – – – – –

Pt RR Reg

Appendix Article Chapter Figure Page,

pages Paragraph Part Radio Regulation Regulation Resolution Section

Note Throughout the course,

safe working practices are to be clearly defined and emphasized with reference to current international requirements and regulations

It is expected that the institution implementing the course will insert references to national and/or regional requirements and regulations as necessary

I:\HTW\1\3-5

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Learning Objectives Subject Areas and topics have been outlined in Part B

In Part C,

the Learning Objectives associated with each topic are provided,

along with teaching aids and references

The Learning Objectives are further described in sufficient detail in the Compendium for the development of a ROC Instructor's Manual as described in Part D

The Learning Objectives are presented in a verb-based manner to facilitate outcomes-driven learning and skills development

All Learning Objectives are understood to be prefixed by the phrase: "The expected learning outcome is that the trainee is able to

" Bear in mind that the overarching competencies to be developed throughout the course are the "transmit and receive of information using GMDSS subsystems and equipment fulfilling the functional requirements of GMDSS" and "provide radio services in emergencies" (STCW,

A-IV/2)

The ROC instructor should strive to present all of the Learning Objectives in or as close to the contexts of real conditions as possible

Through practice and understanding of these Learning Objectives as tasks to master and apply,

the trainee achieves the desired competence and which the instructor may assess in the scored final evaluation

I:\HTW\1\3-5

Introduction

IMO / ITU/ Reference

The statutory framework of the Maritime Mobile Service 2

International Convention of Safety of Life at See

1,0 R8 Ch

Functional requirements 2

Sea Areas 2

Definitions of coverage and sea areas for Digital Selective Calling (DSC)

2 R8 Ch

Carriage requirements

Details of equipment specifications Al,

A4 and A4 2

Details of carriage requirements 2

Means of ensuring availability of ship station equipment

Primary and secondary means of alerting

Bridge alarm panel and its purpose

31 Sect

Requirements for radio safety certificates 2

Watchkeeping R8 Ch

Watchkeeping procedures as defined in the Radio Regulations

Other watchkeeping procedures

Radio personal

Sources of power 2

Reserve power supplies,

capacity and duration as defined in SOLAS Convention 2

Reserve source of energy 2

Prohibitions on the connection of nonGMDSS equipment 2

1,0 R9 Art

36 R9 Art

Radio Regulations

Authority of the master

Secrecy of correspondence

Ship station licences

I:\HTW\1\3-5

Teaching Supports

Learning Objectives

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Inspection of stations

IMO / ITU/ Reference

Radio Operator's Certificates 2

Frequencies 2

Interferences

R9 AP 18 R9 Art

The use of and restrictions for different emissions according to frequencies in the Maritime Mobile Service (MMS)

R9 AP 17,

The role of the various modes of communication

VHF telephony 2

Call categories 2

Distress 2

Urgency

Safety 2

Routine 2

Watchkeeping 3

Identification of radio stations

Identification of ship stations

Ships name 3

Call sign

19 Sect

Maritime Mobile Service Identity

19 Sect

Group calling number

Identification of coast stations

Identification of Search and Rescue Stations

Identification of Vessel Traffic Service stations

Identification of Aids to Navigation

Identification of aircraft stations

Identification of associated craft with parent ship

I:\HTW\1\3-5

Teaching Supports

Learning Objectives

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Service publications

List of Coast Stations and Special Service Stations

List of Ship Stations and Maritime Mobile Service Identity Assignments

Manual for use by the Matitime Mobile and Maritime Mobile-Satellite Services

IMO / ITU/ Reference

Admiralty List of Radio Signals

Technical

Radio wave propagation

Basics 5

Line of sight propagation 5

Ground waves and sky waves 5

UHF and VHF propagation 5

MF propagation 5

LF propagation 5

Modulation basics

Frequency modulation

R9 AP 1 Sect

Amplitude modulation

R9 AP 1 Sect

Bandwidth of different types of modulation 5

Transmitter and receiver basics

Transmitter structure 5

Receiver structure 5

Batteries

Basics 5

Different kinds of batteries

Characteristics of different battery types 5

Primary batteries 5

Secondary batteries 5

Charging batteries,

Maintenance and monitoring of batteries 5

Antennas

I:\HTW\1\3-5

Teaching Supports

Learning Objectives

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

IMO / ITU/ Reference

Teaching Supports

Learning Objectives

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

VHF antennas 5

MF/HF antennas 5

Inmarsat-C Satellite antennas 5

Antenna maintenance

DSC basics

Fault location and service on GMDSS 0,5 marine electronic equipment

GMDSS Components

General

VHF DSC

The use and functions of the VHF radio station installation

DSC possibilities 6

Operational VHF DSC procedures in the GMDSS

Telecommand and traffic information 6

Channel selection in call format 6

DSC acknowledgement 6

DSC relay process 6

Test transmissions

32 R9 Art

Alerting and announcement 6

Distress alert

Distress alert relay

Announcements for all ships (distress,

Announcement to individual station (urgency,

R12 R11,

Group announcement routine)

Polling and position request 6

Automatic/Semi-automatic service with coast 5,0 stations 6

List of practical tasks

I:\HTW\1\3-5

2,0 R9 Art

IMO / ITU/ Reference

Teaching Supports

Learning Objectives

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

VHF voice procedure

Distress procedure 6

Urgency procedure

Safety procedure

Port operation and ship movement communication

Routine communication R11

Calling a subscriber (ship to shore) 6

Phone call from ashore (shore to ship) 6

Transmission of a telegram

T3-1 A3

Intership communication 6

On board communication 1,0

Inmarsat 6

Inmarsat space segment 6

Inmarsat ground segment 6

Cospas / Sarsat

Cospas/Sarsat space segment

34 R9 Res

205 R15

T3-3 A5

T3-3 A5

Cospas/Sarsat ground segment 6

Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB)

The basic operation of the Cospas/Sarsat satellite system and signal routing/path 6

Essential parts of Cospas / Sarsat EPIRBs 6

Basic characteristics of operation on 406 and 121

The registration and coding of a 406 MHz EPIRB 6

The information contents of a distress alert 6

Operation 6

The float-free function 6

The correct use of the lanyard 6

Routine maintenance,

testing requirements and test operation 6

Additional EPIRB features 6

Withdrawal of an unintended false distress

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IMO / ITU/ Reference

Teaching Supports

Learning Objectives

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Practical Tasks 6

15 R9 Res

Search and Rescue Transponder / Transmitter (SART)

Different types of SARTs and their operation 6

Search and rescue radar transponder 6

AIS radar transmitter

Routine maintenance,

testing requirements and test operation R9 AP 15+17

Practical tasks 6

Maritime Safety Information (MSI)

Basics A3

NAVTEX 6

NAVTEX frequencies

T3-1 T3-4 T3-5

NAVTEX system 6

Responsibilities of a NAVTEX Co-ordinator 6

Messages 6

Operation of the NAVTEX receiver 6

Selection of transmitters,

Practical tasks 6

Geographic area messages and Inmarsat 0,5 system messages

Classes of Inmarsat-C receiver types 6

EGC setup 6

Practical tasks 6

MSI via VHF 6

The usage and functions of portable VHF radio

Portable VHF Aeronautical Radio for 121,5 and 123,1 MHZ

Other systems used on board Ultra High Frequency (UHF) handhelds

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Automatic Identification System

Ship Security Alert System

IMO / ITU/ Reference

Search and Rescue (SAR) operation

The role of the Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centre (MRCC):

Maritime rescue organizations 8

Knowledge of SAR systems worldwide 8

International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue (IAMSAR) Manual

The role and method of use of ship reporting systems

Automated Mutual-assistance Vessel Rescue System (AMVER) 8

Japanese Ship Reporting System (JASREP) 8

Australian Ship Reporting System (AUSREP) 8

Long Range Identification and Tracking of Ships (LRIT) 9

Miscellaneous skills and operational procedures for general communications

Use of English in written and oral form 1,0 for safety communications

Use of the IMO Standard Marine Communication Phrases

Use of the International Code of Signals

Recognition of standard abbreviations and commonly used service codes

R9 AP 14

Use of the International Phonetic Alphabet 9

Procedure of traffic charging

The international charging and accounting system 9

The AAIC code and its use 9

Coast station-,

landline and ship station charge 9

Currencies used Coast station-,

landline and ship station charge

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Teaching Supports

Learning Objectives

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Examination A Theoretical examination B Practical examination

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1,0 2,0

IMO / ITU/ Reference

Teaching Supports

Learning Objectives

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

PART D: Instructor Manual General This manual reflects the view of an independent consultant on methodology and organization of the work and is based on his own experience as an instructor

The instructor should use this manual as guidance initially but should work out his own ideas and methods,

based on the experience gained and tailored to suit the various backgrounds of the students

This manual contains guidance on the teaching methods that are considered to be the most appropriate to the subject matter

However,

the instructor himself must decide upon the best methods to adopt in order for the students to attain the specified objectives

IMO references,

The compendium accompanying this course contains text covering some subjects,

which are not adequately covered in the other course material

When using this compendium,

the instructors should take into account the student's prior knowledge of these subjects

Note that the students are training to become operators of radiocommunication equipment and not technicians or engineers

The instructor may choose to use books if deemed suitable for this purpose

There are also many other books covering the GMDSS,

or parts of the GMDSS available throughout the world

A number of videos and CD's are also available

The instructor has to make sure,

that the additional books used for training contain the correct information

It is important that the instructor makes use of official publications wherever possible,

especially those which are required to be carried on board ships

This will serve to familiarize the students with this information

Nevertheless,

national publications should also be taken into account

Note that this compendium contains information of a general nature

when lecturing on technical subjects,

the instructor should make use of the technical manuals covering the actual equipment provided for the course

Lesson plans When choosing the most appropriate teaching method,

it will be necessary to draw up some form of plan

The purpose of a lesson plan is to create the structure for the lessons,

which can be adjusted according to the circumstances

Without such a plan there is a risk of the lesson becoming disorganized and ineffective

The process of producing a lesson plan is also very important as it focuses the instructor's attention on every detail of the course

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HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

The time allocated to each component of the lesson is important,

particularly on short courses where there is little opportunity to compensate for lost time

It is essential that all elements of a lesson be given a reasonable proportion of the available time

Failure to do this would result in the neglect of certain subjects

Other forms of lesson planning may be equally suitable,

the important fact is that planning and preparation are essential to good teaching

Use of personal computers (PCs) More and more use of software based GMDSS simulation will take place in the training of students,

especially with regard to DSC and lnmarsat-C/EGC operations

It is very important to make sure that the students are familiar with this kind of equipment

Where PCs are used for simulating1 communication exercises in this course,

their use should be made as simple and easy as possible

The PCs should be in a network with touchscreens and PTT to handle the different equipment as realistic as possible

The software shall simulate the equipment as realistically as possible in all situations Unless an enhanced course,

which also includes general use of PCs,

the instructor should avoid using precious time on purely PC-related matters

False Distress Alert

The generation and emission of false distress alerts must be avoided and every precaution possible must be taken in order to achieve this

This means that the students must understand the very serious consequences of generating and emitting false distress alerts and be instructed on how to avoid such incidents and on the action they should take if they inadvertently transmit such an alert

The different MRCCs around the globe are facing an increasing number of false alerts (however,

during the last couple of years such incidents have been reduced)

The consequences are a loss of faith in this communication system and in the GMDSS as a concept,

especially within the Search and Rescue Community

It also leads to a serious waste of resources,

In view of the fact that the students are to become professionals,

as a part of their shipboard duties (ref

SOLAS Ch

Regulation 12),

be responsible for the operation of the communication equipment,

therefore the instructor must impress upon them the importance of thinking before using this equipment,

especially regarding DSC and lnmarsat-C

The instructor must also make sure that the students understand the possible danger of false distress alerts being initiated by other members of the crew,

especially those who are able to gain access to equipment though lack of necessary authorization or familiarity with the equipment that is needed to prevent improper operation

Measures 1

Refer to the guidelines in the STCW Code (section B-1/12,

paragraph 67) regarding the use of simulators in training for seafarers

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HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

need to be ensured that whenever anybody on board,

not in possession of a relevant certificate,

may be allowed to use GMDSS equipment for commercial purposes,

this person must be instructed properly and must also be supervised by a responsible operator

As a general rule,

all GMDSS training must be supervised by the Instructor while giving training on real equipment,

this to avoid unintentional alarms

Another problem area is the testing of equipment,

especially the testing of EPIRBs and SARTs

This equipment should only be tested by qualified personnel,

and preferably only in connection with the annual radio survey and in accordance with the prescribed testing procedures (ref

SOLAS Ch

1040/Rev

Furthermore,

a problem may arise during the installation and servicing of the GMDSS equipment

A responsible operator should supervise this work and should ensure that the technician knows about the risk of emission of false Distress alerts that exists unless caution is shown

Procedures to advice RCCs of the transmission of false Distress alerts have been established by IMO

It is necessary for the instructors to gain familiarization with the content of IMO Assembly Resolution A

WRC-12)

Search and Rescue matters When instructing qualified deck officers or students undergoing training in the deck department,

the instructor should take advantage of this fact and use whatever navigational training equipment is available

For instance,

an ARPA simulator and/or a full mission bridge simulator,

or realistic GMDSS simulators (with touchscreens and PTTs) could be an extremely valuable tool for training in SAR communication

If such equipment is available,

the instructor should co-operate with other relevant instructors in order to provide as realistic training as possible

English language The STCW Code requires that any seafarer whose duties include communications shall have a sufficient knowledge of the English language

The Radio Regulations recommend the use of IMO Standard Marine Communication Phrases and,

where language difficulties exist,

the Inter- national Code of Signals should be available for exercises

A general knowledge of the English language is therefore to be expected from the students

The instructor will have to make sure that the students can actually use maritime English for communication purpose

This is extremely necessary regarding Distress,

Urgency and Safety

With regard to the spoken language,

the instructor should conduct the majority of the theoretical and practical training sessions using the English language and require the students to reply to any questions,

and to put their own questions and comments,

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HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Independent Examination On all theoretical subjects,

the examination should be conducted as a combination of written,

practical as well as oral tests

The practical test in combination with the voice procedure can be performed on real equipment which is connected together (VHF) or on PC based simulation with touchscreen and PTT which simulates in a network the equipment as well as the radio conditions and carry out all relevant and necessary general radio communications using radiotelephony and DSC On all practical subjects,

the examination should include a combination of oral tests and practical demonstrations (ref

STCW-Convention,

Section A-IV/2)

A part of the written and oral tests should be conducted in English in order to ensure that the student,

is able to:     

read and understand written Maritime Safety Information (MSI) received via NAVTEX,

Inmarsat-C or voice announcements

Urgency and Safety messages for transmission via VHF DSC

conduct Distress traffic and participate actively in SAR-communications via radiotelephony

read and understand the information given in all relevant service documents,

including relevant parts of the technical documentation

and carry out all relevant and necessary general radio communications using radiotelephony and DSC (Safety,

Urgency,

Routine)

A part of practical tests should be carried out on real equipment or/and on the above mentioned pc based simulation

The student must be able to (see example of trainee's proficiency checklist on use of GMDSS):   

handle all relevant maritime radio equipment (VHF-DSC,

NAVTEX,

GPS etc

) show all communication types (Voice,

DSC etc

) in combination with the operation of the corresponding facilities perform traffic in all kinds of priorities (distress,

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HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Part E: Evaluation Introduction The effectiveness of any evaluation depends on the accuracy of the description of what is to be measured

The learning objectives that are used in the detailed teaching syllabus,

Column 3 Methods for demonstrating competence

set out the methods and criteria for evaluation

Instructors should refer to these when designing the assessment

It is consistent with the intent of STCW that demonstration of skills and practical understanding is determined by direct observation,

while knowledge and theoretical understand is determined through written examination in a variety of question styles

STCW 2010 Code The training and assessment of seafarers required under the Convention are administered,

supervised and monitored in accordance with the provisions of Regulation I/6 of the STCW Convention

Assessment is also covered in detail in IMO Model Courses [3

Assessment Planning Assessment planning should be specific,

realistic and timebound (SMART)

Some methods of assessment that could be used depending upon the course/qualification are as follows and all should be adapted to suit individual needs:  observation (In oral examination,

 questions (written or oral)

 simulation (also refer to section A-I/12 of the STCW code as amended)

Validity The evaluation methods must be based on clearly defined objectives,

and must truly represent what is meant to be assessed

against only the relevant criteria and the syllabus or course guide

There must be a reasonable balance between the subject topics involved and also,

in the testing of trainees' KNOWLEDGE,

UNDERSTANDING AND PROFICIENCY of the concepts

Reliability Assessment should also be reliable (if the assessment was done again with a similar group/learner,

would similar results be achieved)

Different group of learners may have the same subject at different times

If other assessors are also assessing the same course/qualification,

there is need to ensure all are making the same decisions

To be reliable an evaluation procedure should produce reasonably consistent results,

no matter which set of papers or version of the test is used

If instructors are assessing their own trainees,

they need to know what they are to assess and then decide how to do this

The "what" will come from the standards/learning outcomes of the course/qualification they are delivering and the "how" may already be decided for them if it is in assignments,

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HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

The instructors need to consider the best way to assess the skills,

knowledge and attitudes of their learners,

whether this will be formative and/or summative and the validity and reliability of the assessment

All work assessed should be valid,

this is often known as VACSR – "valid assessments create standard results":  valid – the work is relevant to the standards/criteria being assessed

 authentic – the work has been produced solely by the learner

 current – the work is still relevant at the time of assessment

 sufficient – the work covers all the standards/criteria

 reliable – the work is consistent across all learners,

over time and at the required level

It is important to note that no single method can satisfactorily measure knowledge and skill over the entire spectrum of matters to be tested for the assessment of competence

Care should therefore be taken to select the method most appropriate to the particular aspect of competence to be tested,

bearing in mind the need to frame questions which relate as realistically as possible to the requirements of the officer's tasks at sea

Compiling assessments Whilst each examining authority establishes its own rules,

the length of time which can be devoted to assessing the competence of candidates for certificates of competency is limited by practical,

economic and social restraints

Therefore a prime objective of those responsible for the organization and administration of the assessment system is to find the most efficient,

effective and economical method of assessing the competency of candidates

An examination system should effectively test the breadth of a candidate's KNOWLEDGE,

UNDERSTANDING AND PROFICIENCY of the subject areas pertinent to the tasks he is expected to undertake

It is not possible to examine candidates fully in all areas,

so in effect the assessment samples a candidate's KNOWLEDGE,

UNDERSTANDING AND PROFICIENCY by covering as wide a scope as is possible within the time constraints and testing his depth of KNOWLEDGE,

UNDERSTANDING AND PROFICIENCY in selected areas

The assessment as a whole should assess each candidates comprehension of principles,

ideas and arguments and abilities and skills in carrying out the tasks to perform in the duties he or she is to be certificated to undertake

All evaluation and testing techniques have their advantages and disadvantages

An examining authority should carefully analyse precisely what it should be testing and can test

A careful selection of test and evaluation methods should then be made to ensure that the best of the variety of techniques available today is used

Each assessment shall be that best suited to the learning outcome or ability to be assessed

Quality of test items No matter which type of test is used,

it is essential that all questions or test items used should be as brief as possible,

since the time taken to read the questions themselves lengthens the examination

Questions must also be clear and complete

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HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

To ensure this,

it is necessary that they be reviewed by a person other than the originator

No extraneous information should be incorporated into questions Examination guideline The efficient operation of GMDSS depends on the proficiency of the maritime radio operators

The examination should consist of a theoretical and practical part

A Theoretical Examination The theoretical examination should consist of multiple choice questionnaires or a questionnaire in which the applicant can answer the questions with his own words

Every training post should have a pool of approximately 250 to 300 questions spread over the complete field of the section A1 to A6

Each questionnaire should consist of approximately 100 questions

A1: Basic knowledge of the GMDSS  Different components of the GMDSS  Construction of the GMDSS  Sea areas  Carriage requirements  Knowledge of the regulations and agreements in the maritime mobile service (Radio Regulations,

SOLAS etc

)  Regulations concerning documentation  Preservation of the secrecy of correspondence A2: Types of communication in the maritime mobile service  Distress,

urgency and safety communication  Public correspondence  Port operation service  Ship movement service  Intership communication  On board communication A3: Types of station in the maritime mobile service  Ship stations  Ship Earth stations  Coast stations  Coast Earth stations  Pilot stations,

 Aircraft stations  Rescue Coordination Centre (RCC) A4: Elementary knowledge of radio frequencies and frequency bands  Frequency and wavelength  The units of frequencies: Hz,

 The subdivision of the most significant part of the radio  VHF/MF spectrum,

propagation and typical ranges

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HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

A5: Frequencies allocated to the maritime mobile service  Modes of communication (Radiotelephony,

DSC)  The concept of radio channel: simplex,

paired and unpaired channels and frequencies

 Channelling systems in the VHF maritime mobile band,

including allocations for the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS)

 Distress and safety frequencies  Intership communications frequencies  Port operations frequencies  Ship movement frequencies  Calling frequencies A6: Maintaining the functionality of a ship station  Sources of energy of ship stations  Batteries  Different kinds of batteries and their characteristics  Charging  Maintenance of batteries  Antenna maintenance  Functional tests B Practical Examination In the practical examination several applicants can proof their knowledge at the same time depending on the technical equipment

For each applicant a protocol as shown in Annex I should be used

To conduct GMDSS distress-,

safety- and routine radio traffic in English language by means of case examples on real radio devices on dummy loads communicating with each other or on approved networked GMDSS simulation equipment which meets all applicable performance standards set out in Regulation I/12 of the STCW-Convention,

B1: Detailed practical knowledge and ability to use radio equipment (see Annex 1) B2: Detailed practical knowledge of distress,

safety and routine communication procedures in radiotelephony  Distress communication o Alert,

call and message (including DSC,

EPIRB and SART) o Distress traffic with ship stations,

coast stations and aircraft stations o Cessation of distress traffic o Withdrawing of a false distress alert  Urgent communication o Announcement,

call and message o Urgency traffic with ship stations,

coast stations and aircraft stations o Cessation urgency traffic

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HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

 Safety communication o Announcement,

call and message o Safety traffic with ship stations,

coast stations and aircraft stations o Cessation safety traffic  Routine communication o Ship station to Ship station o Ship to Coast station B3: Ability of using Handbooks and ITU Lists  List of coast station and Special Service Stations  List of Ship Stations and Maritime Mobile Service Identity Assignments  Handbook for the use by the Maritime Mobile and Maritime Mobile Satellite Services (Maritime Manual)  Admiralty List (Vol I and Vol III)

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HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

Information Requested of Instructors who implement IMO Model Courses Introduction 1 IMO model courses are periodically revised to take into account the changes which have taken place in relevant Conventions,

resolutions and other matters affecting each course

To help IMO to improve the content of courses when they are revised,

the assistance of all instructors who implement or participate in implementing courses is requested,

whether the implementation is part of an IMO technical cooperation project or part of a Maritime Training Academy's regular programme

Information requested and its format 2 To simplify their consolidation by IMO,

the technical comments and suggestions for the improvement of model courses should follow the format that is outlined below

If no comments or suggestions are to be provided under topic,

please insert "no comments" against the item

and 4 the approximate number of times you have implemented this particular model course

please comment on the items (`Scope',

'Objectives',

) in the order in which they appear in the course

please indicate: 1 the number of participants who met the entry standards and the number who did not

if the recommendations in 'Course intake limitations' were exceeded,

the reasons for this and your observations on the effect of this on the quality of the course

please indicate the nature of the deficiency and give your observations of the effect of this on the quality of presentation of the course

and 4 any lack of equipment or facilities as compared with the recommendations under 'Teaching facilities and equipment' and your observations of the effect on this lack on the quality of presentation of the course

please bear in mind that minor variations in time allocations are inevitable

Major difficulties with allocations of time and any omissions or redundancies of subject areas should be briefly explained

please identify the specific learning objectives concerned by their paragraph numbers

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HTW 1/3/5 Annex,

please clearly identify the section concerned

If the bibliography or the practical exercises are found to be unsatisfactory,

please identify suitable alternative texts,

or outline alternative exercises,

please clearly identify the paragraphs being commented upon

In particular,

your views on the usefulness of the course material to you in implementing the course would be appreciated,

as would the contribution to IMO of any additional teaching material you found useful in implementing it

Please address your comments to: International Maritime Organization 4,

Albert Embankment London SE1 7SR United Kingdom Tel +44 (0)20 7735 7611 Fax +44 (0)20 7587 3210 Email: [email protected]

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Annex 1: Example of trainee's practical proficiency checklist VHF-DSC Transmit capabilities DSC distress alert without nature of distress DSC distress alert with nature of distress DSC relay to all stations DSC relay to an individual station (coast station or ship station) DSC all stations urgency announcement with working channel DSC ship to ship urgency announcement with working channel DSC ship to coast station urgency announcement DSC all stations safety announcement with working channel DSC ship to ship safety announcement with working channel DSC ship to coast station safety announcement DSC ship to ship routine announcement with working channel DSC ship to coast station safety announcement DSC group announcement (urgency,

routine) with working channel DSC geographic area announcement (urgency,

routine) with working channel DSC polling DSC position request DSC medical transport Other capabilities Select DSC received messages out of memory (distress + non di