PDF- jdm jazz fake book,think -How To Play From A Fake Book Keyboard Edition - APESEG - How to Play From a Fake Book

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How to Play from a Fake Book without Gettin’ the Blues

Index of Chapters CHAPTER 7

Dominant 9th Chords

Page 156

This is one of the most common sounds in jazz,

CHAPTER 8

Slash Chords

Page 169

Slash chords are fake book notation for inversions

These can either be combination chords such as a G chord over an A bass note,

such as a G chord over its fifth,

CHAPTER 1

Am7 and D7

CHAPTER 9

Your first three chords and how to recognize them

CHAPTER 2

Em and C

Page 16

The six minor and the four major chords

Drills to expand your skills CHAPTER 3

Seventh Chords

Page 32

CHAPTER 4

Page 64

Practice realizing common melodic patterns from a chart – along with the II > V pattern CHAPTER 5

Diminished Chords

Page 81

Learn the ins and outs of this fancy sound

A wealth of exercises to study for mastery

CHAPTER 6

Flat 9 and Flat 5

Page 117

These dominant chords are basically variations on the diminished chord

Learn how to think of them this way,

which will allow these somewhat difficult chords to suddenly seem a lot easier

Page 183

Learn common voicings that allow you to move some of the notes from the right hand to the left

Especially common are the Root-7th voicing and the Root-3rd voicing in the left hand

CHAPTER 10

How to read and understand the richer and more expressive sounds of Seventh Chords

Common Patterns

Dividing the Workload

Page 194

The final piece in the puzzle,

the sixth and the thirteen chord are some of the most pungent and interesting in your tonal pallet

Learn to make them soar

INTRODUCTION This book is my sixth piano book related to playing from fake books and improvising at the piano

This book takes many of the ideas I put forward in “How to Speed Read Piano Chord Symbols” and its sequel and expands on them,

offering the aspiring pianist more in depth study on these famous and beautiful patterns

I tried in this book to refrain from showing the chords in an encyclopedic way

I can’t stand piano books that promise to teach you every piano chord,

but then show them one after another in sequences that are more related to the convenience of the author than to the any relationship that is common in music

So unless it was particularly instructive to do so,

none of the chords will be shown in a “phone book” style in this book

You will see them in context,

adjacent to the chords with which they usually cohabitate

After you have studied these patterns,

you will start to recognize them every time you play a piece

many of the exercises in this book will show the sequence in an “annotated” format,

I took the time to write the note names under the staff

! This will make this book infinitely easier to digest for the 95% of you who are not fantastic sightreaders

Another pet peeve of mine when I’m trying to study out of piano books is when they write the music in strange keys that are painful to decipher

These annotations will help keep you breezing along

And once you’ve played through an exercise once or twice,

you won’t need the annotations anymore

So this book will actually help you sight reading as well

I just finished this book in April,

so please give me any feedback you as far as suggestions for revision in future editions

may you enjoy many hours of piano playing pleasure

C H A P T E R

Chapter

Chapter 1 – G,

Am7 and D7 This is the note Middle C:

It is just to the left of the two black keys at the center of your keyboard

C This the note G:

It is the leftmost of the two white keys between the three black keys

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This is the note C and the note G played together:

And here’s how it looks on the keyboard:

When you play two (or more) notes together at the same time,

Let’s add one more note to our chord

It is the note A

A is the rightmost of the two white keys between the three black keys:

A Here’s how A looks on the staff:

Now let’s play all three of these notes together

Play the A with your left hand

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This chord is called A minor 7

It is written Am7 for short

In this book,

I will usually only write the right hand notes on the staff

The left hand notes will be determined by the chord symbol written above the staff

So Am7 will look like this:

Here you see the C and the G written in the right hand,

and the left hand note is determined by the symbol written above the staff

So by seeing “Am7” written above the staff,

you know to play A in the left hand

Now let’s learn another chord

This chord is called “D Dominant” or “D Seven”

It will look like this:

If you look carefully,

you will notice that the bottom note is same between the two chords

The note “middle C”

It sits on the first ledger line below the staff

The higher note is the note F# (pronounced “F Sharp”)

Here is F# by itself:

Here’s how F# looks on the piano

It is the leftmost of the three black keys:

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C H A P T E R

And here’s how F# looks in the chord D7:

Play the D'in the left hand

So let’s alternate

Play Am7,

(Here’s Am7 again for easy reference)

Here’s how the notated music would look:

And here’s the music again,

this time with the notes written in below the staff:

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C H A P T E R

Let’s learn another chord – the G chord

The G chord uses the note G,

which you’ve already learned and one other note – the note B

Here’s the note B

It is white key just to the right of the three black keys:

B Here’s how the note B looks on the staff:

It is just below the first ledger line

Here it is with the note G

The note G sits on the second line of the five lines of the staff:

To make these two notes a G chord,

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Now let’s practice moving between the three chords we’ve learned

Most often in music,

you will not see the chords stripped down to their bare essence,

More often,

you see melody notes or extra notes added on

Try reading through this example (I’ve written the notes below the staff)

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C H A P T E R

In the key of G,

A and B:

G sits on the second line of the staff

B sits on the middle line of the staff

A sits on the space between them

It is the second space on the staff

G G is the leftmost of the two white keys between the three black keys

A A is the rightmost of the two white keys between the three black keys

B B is the note just to the right of the three black keys

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C H A P T E R

Let’s look at some combinations of Am7 to D7 to G,

In the following example,

the note A is added to the Am7 and the D7

(The diagrams above only show the right hand,

be sure to add the left hand notes

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The note A can also be added down the octave

It sits on the second ledger line below the staff

(The diagrams above only show the right hand,

be sure to add the left hand notes

Now let’s look at this variation

Over your Am7 chord,

This makes the chord an Am9 chord

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Look at this harmonization of “Mary Had a Little Lamb”

See if you can pick out some of the chords you’ve learned

Now let’s look at “Mary had a Little Lamb” in pieces

First the melody:

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Now just add a bass note in the left hand

When you see the chord symbol above a note,

simply add that note in the left hand somewhere

let’s go back and play it again,

we’ll add chord tones underneath the melody in the right hand

The left hand is still only playing the root of the chord

I’ve written in the notes to add under the melody

This time I’ve left out the melody notes

If you can’t figure them out,

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In the previous example we saw several new voicings of the G chord

A voicing is a different arrangement of the notes in a chord

The first voicing of G we learned was like this

(remember to add the bass note,

G) You can easily invert this to either this:

G or this:

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C H A P T E R

Take a look at this example

Notice how the notes in the chords are the same,

Here’s the same chords,

You’ll notice,

sometimes the G chord has the note D'added,

The note D'is the fifth of the chord

The fifth is not a necessary note,

but adds fullness to the chord

Here are various voicings of the G chord,

both with and without the extra note,

(Remember to add G in the left hand

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Which voicing of G you will see (or use) in a song depends on the melody

In “Mary had a Little Lamb”,

the songs starts on the 3rd scale degree,

and so you will use B at the top of your G chord

The song “Here comes the Bride” starts on the fifth scale degree,

so you would start with the note D'on the top of your G chord:

Here are four common voicings of G and D7,

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Here are the same patterns,

only this time the G and D7 chords alternate

I’ve only written in a few of the notes

The other ones you’ll have to figure out yourself

Silent Night: I’ve written in only the top note of the chord

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C H A P T E R

Chapter

Chapter 2 – Em and C The chord Em is comprised of the first three lines of the staff: E,

G and B

The top two notes,

you already know from the G chord

The last note,

the note E is the bottom line of the staff

On the keyboard it sits just to the right of the two black keys

Here’s an example of a common chord pattern using Em:

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you will see the Em chord broken up between the right and left hand

For example,

if you play the E in the left hand,

that leaves the G and B in the right:

You’ve probably noticed that these are the same two notes in the G chord

to switch between a G chord (played with just the notes G and B) and an Em chord,

you can simply move the left hand bass note from G to E

As with the various voicings of G,

you can move the G and B in the right hand and still have an Em chord

Here are four voicings of Em,

using only the notes B and G in the right hand:

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Here are two other variations:

To make an Em chord,

all you really need are the root and 3rd of the chord – the notes E and G

So you could see variations without the note B in the Em chord:

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Let’s practice moving between Em and the other chords we’ve learned

Here’s the same exercise,

I’ve only written the melody note on the staff:

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here’s the exercise one last time

This time it’s written how it would be written in a fake book: just the melody and the chord symbols

You fill in the chords

The Third of a Chord The most essential note in a chord after the root is the third of the chord

Let’s study the chords we’ve learned so far to get to know their thirds

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The third of a G chord is B

Therefore the simplest G chord would be the note B in the right hand and the root note,

The third of an Em chord is G

Therefore the simplest Em chord would be the note G in the right hand and the root note,

The third of an Am chord is C

Therefore the simplest Am chord would be the note C in the right hand and the root note,

The third of an D'chord is F#

Therefore the simplest D'chord would be the note F# in the right hand and the root note,

The first four chords in this sequence are constructed of only the third in the right and the root in the left:

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After the third and the root,

the most common note to add to a chord is the fifth

Here is the sequence above,

only this time with the fifth added to each chord

Below the staff,

I’ve written the note name of the fifth of each chord:

The fifth can also be above the third like this:

Most of the time you will want to vary the voicings you use,

otherwise the chords don’t seem to move smoothly

Notice how changing just the Am and the final G in this sequence makes the music seem so much smoother

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C H A P T E R

When you reading from fake books,

which voicing to use is usually obvious because of the melody note

For example,

if you are playing an Am chord and the melody note is E,

you’ll want to keep the E on top:

You would most likely voice this Am with the third of the chord (C) just below the melody note

If on the other hand,

you would use lower notes on the staff:

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Here’s a likely solution:

Often simple solutions will sound just as good as more complex ones:

(Same as above,

but leave out the fifth from the Am and the D7 chords

The chord C:

C It looks like this on the staff:

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C is related to Am in the same way that G is related to Em: The root and third of C are the third and fifth of Am:

For example,

see how the Am and the C in this example are the same in the right hand:

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This sort of knowledge is useful when harmonizing a song and playing by ear

Because instead of choosing between seven different chords to harmonize a melody note,

you are often only choosing between three primary flavors of chords: The I chord,

In the key of G,

the IV chord is C and the V chord is D

The other chords are just variations on these chords

For example,

Am is just a variant of C

In fact often,

the only difference between them is the root:

The relative Minor If you go down 3 keys to the left and add that note to a chord (and remove the top note) you get the relative minor of the original chord

For example,

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The relative minor of G is Em:

Three keys down (skip two keys)

Notice how the root of the relative minor is down 3 keys from the original root

Here’s another example,

The relative minor of C is Am:

Here’s the chords from the previous page written out on the staff:

You can also move to the relative minor by replacing the top note with the root of the relative minor

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C H A P T E R

The top note of a G in root position (the 5th) is replaced with the root of the Em

The top note of a C in root position (the 5th) is replaced with the root of the Am

Here’s the same harmony written out with two different voices

Notice how the bottom two notes of the major chords hold though and become part of their relative minor chords

If the G chord starts in first inversion,

the middle note moves up to the E:

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C H A P T E R

Practice this exercise

Here different inversions help to create a smooth scale in the melody:

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Here’s an exercise to practice reading inversions

Practice this several times,

where only the melody note is given

On the last system you see the chord D7,

D7 is basically the same as D,

except that you replace the note D'with the note C

The most important notes (besides the root) in the D7 chord are F# (the third) and C (the seventh)

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C H A P T E R

Now repeat the last exercise,

this time filling in the chord from the melody

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S E V E N T H

Chapter

C H O R D'S

Chapter 3 – Seventh Chords In root position seventh chords have an extra note on the top

This is Em:

This is Em7:

This is Am:

This is Am7:

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C H O R D'S

Play through this exercise:

One handy way to think of minor seventh chords is that they are a combination of a minor root and it’s relative major

This is especially handy because you can play any major chord in the right hand,

and the root of the relative minor in the left and you’ll have a nice full sounding minor seventh chord

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C H O R D'S

So if you see these minor seventh chords,

you can simply play the relative major in the right hand,

while playing the root of the minor seventh in the left

G chord in the right hand,

C chord in the right hand,

Here’s another example:

G chord in the right hand,

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C chord in the right hand,

S E V E N T H

C H O R D'S

Bm and Bm7 Here’s the chord Bm:

Try this exercise:

To make Bm7,

just put a D'chord in the right hand and the note B in the left:

Practice:

D chord in the right hand,

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C H O R D'S

Here’s more practice using minor seventh chords

(G in the right hand

(C in the right hand

(D in the right hand

(C in the right hand

For a D13 chord,

play B instead of A (the 6th instead of the 5th)

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S E V E N T H

C H O R D'S

Now practice reading this chart

(It’s the same as the last page,

but without the chords written in

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C H O R D'S

GM7 If you add the note G below a Bm chord,

you get the chord GM7 (Pronounced “G Major 7”)

Just like our minor seventh chords,

major seventh chords are combination chords

Only with major seventh chords,

you take the root down four half-steps (skip three keys)

Chord type in Steps down from rightright hand hand chord to bass

Major Seventh

Minor Seventh

So if you wanted to change GM7 to minor seventh chord,

you could take the root (G) up a half-step (to G#) and change the chord on top (Bm) to a major chord (B)

B chord in right hand

Bm chord in right hand

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S E V E N T H

C H O R D'S

So let’s look at one of the minor seventh chords we already know and change it to a major seventh chord

Let’s change Am7 to AbM7

Drop the root a half-step (from A to Ab) – and change the C chord in the right hand to a C minor chord (drop the third from E to Eb)

A AbM7:

Left Hand

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S E V E N T H

C H O R D'S

Let’s practice the chords C,

Cm and AbM7 in several different voicings

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S E V E N T H

C H O R D'S

Now here’s the same exercise,

Once you have mastered playing it from the last page,

practice realizing it from this page

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S E V E N T H

C H O R D'S

Let’s go back and practice Bm and GM7

To move from G to Bm in the right hand,

simply change the note G (in the G chord) to F#

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C H O R D'S

Turning any major chord into a major seventh chord As we saw in the last exercise,

if you take G and lower the root (G) a half-step,

This is true for any major chord

You can lower the root of any major chord and get a major seventh chord

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C H O R D'S

When we took the root of the G chord down a half-step,

This is true for any major chord

If you lower the root a half-step,

you get a minor chord built on the original chords third (the third is the middle note in root position)

Here’s the exercise from the previous page,

only this time the major seventh chords have been replaced with minor chords

Remember,

these minor chords related to the Major chord just before them

Just lower the root of the Major chord (for example,

take the D'of the D'chord down to C#) and then change the root to the root of the minor chord (in this case,

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S E V E N T H

C H O R D'S

Dominant Seventh Chords So far in this chapter we’ve looked at minor seventh chords and major seventh chords

There is a third type of seventh chord called the “dominant seventh chord”

You’ve learned one dominant seventh chord so far,

You can find dominant seventh chords in a similar manner to finding major seventh chords – just take the root note down two half-steps in the right hand

you took the root note down only one half-step

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S E V E N T H

C H O R D'S

Try this chord progression:

To make the two middle chords dominant instead of minor,

just raise the third of each chord:

Practice these variations on the progression above:

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S E V E N T H

C H O R D'S

So far we’ve learned to find dominant seventh chords by taking the root down two half-steps

You can find the seventh note in a dominant chord from the fifth

The seventh note in a dominant chord (the minor seventh) is up three half-steps from the fifth

The fifth is on top in root position

The note up a minor third is the minor seventh

This is the note you will add to a major chord to make it a dominant chord

Remember,

In other words: skip two keys

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C H O R D'S

The interval between the fifth and the minor seventh of a dominant chord figures prominently in the blues

Blues progressions such as the one above sound nice with a boogie-woogie style lefthand accompaniment

To make a boogie-woogie bass,

just alternate between the fifth and sixth of a chord like this in the left hand:

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C H O R D'S

Often in chord progressions,

minor chords will alternate with dominant chords:

Let’s learn a simple version of this progression

It looks like this:

First just play the third and root for each chord:

Now play just the root and third in the right hand for each chord:

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C H O R D'S

Now for each chord,

replace the root in the right hand with the minor seventh

the minor seventh is two half-steps below the root

Now just switch the order of the right hand notes on every other chord like this

You’ll notice that the third of Bm chord becomes the minor seventh of the E7 chord,

and likewise with the next measure

the third of Am chord becomes the minor seventh of the D7 chord:

The first four chords above are voiced with only the third and seventh in the right hand

This is often called in jazz a “shell voicing”

(You can learn more about them in my book “How to Speed Read Piano Chord Symbols

”) Now let’s replace the Bm7 with the fuller version we learned at the beginning of this chapter

Remember,

for Bm7 play a D'chord in the right hand and for Am7 play a C chord in the right hand

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S E V E N T H

C H O R D'S

Now try this version,

with doublings on the E7 and D7:

Here are some simple chords made with just the root and the 3rd

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C H O R D'S

In this exercise,

you will compare major chords with their major seventh and dominant seventh variations

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C H O R D'S

Here’s the same exercise written out fake-book style

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C H O R D'S

Here’s the same exercise transposed down a half-step

I added a few hints,

Don’t get creative on this one,

just realize the chords the same way as the last two pages

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C H O R D'S

Minor Seventh Chords Start on Em7,

then move all four notes of each chord down a half-step from chord to chord

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C H O R D'S

Here’s another exercise for the minor seventh chords

This time,

each measure starts with a major chord

The second chord in that measure is a minor seventh chord built on the relative minor of the first chord

In other words,

once you have found the first chord,

bring the left hand note (the root) down 3 half steps (i

If you have trouble finding any of the notes,

return to the previous page for help

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C H O R D'S

Here’s the same exercise,

I’ve left the fifth out of each chord

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C H O R D'S

Here is same exercise,

except that the order of the notes in the right hand has been flipped

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C H O R D'S

Here’s another exercise to relate minor seventh chords to their relative major chord

If you’re having trouble reading this,

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C H O R D'S

Here’s the same exercise,

only with the notes written in for those who need it

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C H O R D'S

Let’s find minor seventh chords by finding the 3rd and 7th from the root

S T E P

F I N D

M I N O R

The 3rd of a minor chord is up a minor third

To find a minor 3rd,

S T E P

F I N D

M I N O R

The minor seventh is down a whole-step from the root

To find a whole-step,

Minor 7th

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Minor 7th

S E V E N T H

C H O R D'S

Practice finding minor seventh chords from the root

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C H O R D'S

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

Chapter

P R O G R E S S I O N S

Chapter 4 – Common Patterns Nothing will speed your ability to read from fakebooks than practicing common patterns

Here’s a typical melody with typical chords:

If we want to make a general rule as to what must be added to fill out these chords: 1

You need the root of each chord in the left hand 2

You need the third of each chord in the right hand 3

You need the seventh of each chord if it’s a seventh chord So for the chord C,

we’re going to need to add the third (E)

Since the melody jumps across the E at the middle of the keyboard,

we’re going to have to use the E down the octave (at first)

You want your melody on top,

and you don’t want your chord tones too close

So you can either play the E in the left hand along with the bass,

or play it with the right hand on the first note and then drop it out when the note jumps up too high to hold on to it

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

If the melody is too low in the right hand,

you can place the chord tones down the octave,

either in the left hand or – where able – in the right

Another (easier) option is to add the necessary chord tones later in the measure:

For the Dm7 chord,

the third (F) is already in the melody,

so only the seventh (C) must be added

For the G7 chord,

the seventh (F) is already in the melody,

so only the third (B) must be added

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

The last measure of this section uses the same two chords,

but this the melody doesn’t incorporate either the 7th or the 3rd of either chord

So to the Dm7,

you must add the 3rd (F) and the 7th (C)

To the G7 you must also add the 3rd (B) and the 7th (F)

On the following page,

we’ll practice realizing the chords C,

Dm7 and G7

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

In this exercise,

you’ll work through common variations on the C > Dm7 > G7 > C chord progression

In the first two measures,

the progression is written out fakebook style,

see if you can figure out the chords,

then study the realization that I’ve written in in the following two measures

FAKEBOOK CHART

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SUGGESTED REALIZATION

C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

Now let’s start to practice the same common chord patterns in different keys

Here’s the key of G

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

The Key of D:

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

Key of Bb:

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

The Key of Eb:

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

Key of A:

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

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C O M M O N

C H O R D

P R O G R E S S I O N S

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How to play JAZZ BASS LINES.pdf

walking bass - MIGU MUSIC

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How to Play Killer Blues Solos on the Saxophone

Lead Guitar Solos - Esyes

PDF How To Play Killer Blues And Rockin Sax Solos With 7 Cie4slnetcie4slnet cf how to play killer blues and rockin sax solos with 7 notes or less pdf PDF How To Play Killer Blues And Rockin Sax Solos With 7

How to Play Piano Despite Years of Lessons

How To Play The Piano Despite Years Of Lessons What Music Is

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How to Play The Allan Holdsworth Bebop Scale _ MattWarnockGuitar.pdf

Melody Chords For Guitar By Allan Holdsworth - Download Book

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How to Play the English Opening by Karpov

The English Opening Mihail Marin - Quality Chess

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How to Play the Races and Win - Mark Mellen

The Power of Play: The Portrayal and Performance of Race in Video

Horse Race Game To play, you need a pair of dice, a deck of cards, and the Horse Race game board! From the deck of cards, discard the aces, kings, and  IT WOULD SOUND LIKE 2ND RACE, $50 00 PLACE ON No 6 YOU ARE

How To Play the Shakuhachi: A Guide to the Japanese Bamboo Flute by Yoshinobu Taniguchi

The Shakuhachi - komuso

Thank you for purchasing SHAKUHACHI, part of Sonica Instruments' Being a wind instrument, the shakuhachi is played by varying techniques from moment to   tones Historically, the shakuhachi has a connection to Zen Buddhism In its religious context, it is played not for entertainment, but

How to Play Ukulele Chord Progressions

James Hill Ukulele Initiative

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How to Predict Using Jaimini Chara

What is Vedic Astrology - VEDICSKYCOM

Jul 29, 2007 which has turned to be a very effective tool for prediction But I had to use Chara dasha and many other dashas of Jaimini out of sheer System of prediction that is yet to be published Besides these

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